Culture Darwinism Intelligent Design Media Natural selection Science fiction

Science fiction writer is not a Darwin fan

Vox Day (actually Theodore Beale, a science fiction writer and video game designer) has been critiquing Darwinian evolution (which he calls TENS – Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection) of late: Here, he talks about recent findings that bird beaks don’t necessarily change to adapt to environmental conditions (as was thought to be the case Read More…

Human evolution Intelligent Design

Neanderthals were way smarter hunters than we used to think

From ScienceDaily: Neanderthals have been imagined as the inferior cousins of modern humans, but a new study by archaeologists at UCL reveals for the first time that they produced weaponry advanced enough to kill at a distance. The study, published in Scientific Reports, examined the performance of replicas of the 300,000 year old Schöningen spears Read More…

Culture Intelligent Design Mathematics Religion

Two plus two equals five is not good theology in a rational universe

Some of us try not to wade into theology as such very much for the same reasons as we try to avoid taking a whack at the tarbaby. Where theology is directly relevant – for example if someone claims that there is an “artistic license to lie” about traditional religious ideas about the universe, well, Read More…

Intelligent Design

Evolutionary Teleonomy: Support from Mainstream Evolutionary Biologists

Two years ago, I started suggesting not only should the modern synthesis be dropped, I suggested an alternative (ID-friendly) paradigm that could be used in its place in evolutionary biology. This week, a near-identical concept was suggested by a major evolutionary biologist in a mainstream journal. I coined the term “evolutionary teleonomy” to refer to Read More…

Darwinism Intelligent Design stasis

It takes a smart robot to mimic a Permian “reptile”

It takes a smart robot to mimic a reptile When researchers built a robot to sprawl like a prehistoric reptile, they were in for a surprise Early Permian era Orobates’ skeleton was “exquisitely preserved,” which created an excellent opportunity for researchers in paleontology to try to figure out how the lizard-like animal moved. And reverse Read More…