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History prof Richard Weikart tells the truth about Darwin n’ God

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Here. In response to a pious ninny job, pretending otherwise.

Ever since Darwin was laid to rest in Westminster Abbey, well-intentioned, but ill-informed or gullible people have either tried to convert Darwin posthumously to their own religious views or else have branded him an arch-atheist. Many years after he died, a rumor arose that Darwin had converted to Christianity on his deathbed, and this became a persistent legend among evangelical Christians. The historian James Moore devoted an entire book to dismantling this myth, but the rumor still circulates despite his exposé

He stated further, “I can indeed hardly see how anyone ought to wish Christianity to be true; for if so the plain language of the text seems to show that the men who do not believe, and this would include my Father, Brother and almost all my best friends, will be everlastingly punished. And this is a damnable doctrine”[3]. Not only did he remonstrate against Christianity, but Darwin also explained that the “argument from the existence of suffering against the existence of an intelligent first cause seems to me a strong one”[4]. No wonder his relatives withheld publication of this section on religion from the first edition of his autobiography. Darwin’s anti-religious remarks were deemed too explosive. Unfortunately, some still want to edit out this part of Darwin’s life.

2 Replies to “History prof Richard Weikart tells the truth about Darwin n’ God

  1. 1
    bevets says:

    I have lately read Morley’s Life of Voltaire and he insists strongly that direct attacks on Christianity (even when written with the wonderful force and vigor of Voltaire) produce little permanent effect: real good seems only to follow the slow and silent side attacks. ~ Charles Darwin

  2. 2
    bornagain77 says:

    as to this comment:

    Darwin also explained that the “argument from the existence of suffering against the existence of an intelligent first cause seems to me a strong one”[4].

    Perhaps on superficial examination it seems that the existence of suffering is a strong argument against God, but an in-depth examination, free of ’emotional baggage’ inherent therein, on the coexistence of suffering and God, evaporates that supposed strength:

    What about Suffering and the Existence of God – William Lane Craig – video
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTdjHOcaew4

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