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Recent anti-design book we never heard about

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Intelligently designed : how creationists built the campaign against evolution (University of Illinois, October 2013)

Tracing the growth of creationism in America as a political movement, this book explains why the particularly American phenomenon of anti-evolution has succeeded as a popular belief. Conceptualizing the history of creationism as a strategic public relations campaign, Edward Caudill examines why this movement has captured the imagination of the American public, from the explosive Scopes trial of 1925 to today’s heated battles over public school curricula. Caudill shows how creationists have appealed to cultural values such as individual rights and admiration of the rebel spirit, thus spinning creationism as a viable, even preferable, alternative to evolution.

In particular, Caudill argues that the current anti-evolution campaign follows a template created by Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan, the Scopes trial’s primary combatants. Their celebrity status and dexterity with the press prefigured the Moral Majority’s 1980s media blitz, more recent staunchly creationist politicians such as Sarah Palin and Mike Huckabee, and creationists’ savvy use of the Internet and museums to publicize their cause. Drawing from trial transcripts, media sources, films, and archival documents, Intelligently Designed highlights the importance of historical myth in popular culture, religion, and politics and situates this nearly century-old debate in American cultural history.

It’s by U Tennessee journalism prof Edward Caudill. I assume it’s anti-design because he seems to think that everything depends on expert public relations and nothing on actual evidence from nature of the inadequacies and defects of Darwinian theory.

By the way, doubts about Darwin cannot be just an American phenomenon, not if you go by: Researcher Ken Ammi on that British Darwin doubt

Here is Intelligently Designed on Amazon, at 633,000.

Meanwhile, Steve Meyer’s Darwin’s Doubt, published the same year:

It’s got to be PR. Couldn’t have anything to do with problems around Darwinian evolution, such as Meyer describes. That would just complicate the narrative. Or, as an English prof would say these days, meta-narrative.

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6 Replies to “Recent anti-design book we never heard about

  1. 1
    jerry says:

    The book is expensive and only 280 pages. ($76.50 for hardback and $16.50 for Kindle) It equates intelligent design with creationism. So it is probably more of a history of creationism than of intelligent design.

    Reading too many things now to get this.

  2. 2
    jerry says:

    Should be $13.50 for the Kindle version.

  3. 3
    awstar says:

    Their celebrity status and dexterity with the press prefigured the Moral Majority’s 1980s media blitz, more recent staunchly creationist politicians such as Sarah Palin and Mike Huckabee, and creationists’ savvy use of the Internet and museums to publicize their cause.

    The celebrities go much further back than that. Almost 2000 years ago Jesus said: “Have you not read that He who created them from the beginning MADE THEM MALE AND FEMALE”

    And even before that, almost 3500 years ago, Moses wrote: “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.”

    Why it’s almost as if these crafty right-winged celebrities were trying to stamp out evolutionism before it was even thought of.

  4. 4
    jerry says:

    The author, Edward Caudill, has written 4 books on evolution. Besides the above:

    Scopes Trial: Photographic History

    Darwinian Myths: The Legends and Misuses of a Theory

    Darwinism in the Press: the Evolution of An Idea

  5. 5
    Dr JDD says:

    I would have bought it but the non-central positioning of the title on the cover led me to believe that it was an example of “bad design”. I have difficulty accepting that a bad design could come about through intelligent processes therefore I conclude that book must not be written intelligently.

    This is unfortunate as I was ready to part with my hard-earned cash to educate myself of the error of my ways as well.

  6. 6
    tjguy says:

    ... and creationists’ savvy use of the Internet and museums to publicize their cause.

    If using museums and the internet is a “no no”, if this is such a horrible thing, why do the secularists do it?!

    Is there a rule that you have to be an evolutionist, an atheist, or a secularist to open a museum or share information on the internet?

    Considering sheer numbers, monetary resources, and media bias, it would seem the evolutionists have a great advantage.

    The numbers of govt funded museums promoting evolution far outweigh the number of creationist museums.

    The press is in bed with the Darwinist camp and often times refuse to give opportunity for IDers or creationists to publish articles. Although they gladly publish anti creationist literature, often they won’t even allow us to respond with a letter to the editor to defend our position! Suppression seems to be their strategy.

    So with such a huge advantage, and supposedly with all the evidence on their side, it really is surprising that the whole nation has not been indoctrinated yet.

    In spite of what they do, they complain about us opening museums and using the internet! Go figure!

    Where’s the logic in that?

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