Media

Media: It isn’t bias as such that is the problem today, it is “shaping perceptions”, journalist says

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David Warren comes to some interesting conclusions on the decay of current legacy media, conclusions that you can mull over for yourself. But these are the observations I chiefly wish to note:

Nothing is new under the sun, not even decay, but the slide of mainstream journalism — not merely into partisanship, but into the assertion of falsehoods and the hiding of truth — has become a public issue. Polls show declining public trust: Journalists often rank below politicians. More to the point, I have myself noticed the collapse of standards from within the trade, over several decades.One way to put this would be: “There are no broadsheets any more, only tabloids.” News media have become indistinguishable from the media of mass entertainment, reflecting a larger collapse of moral and educational standards. Reporters have become scriptwriters; editors have become impresarios; and, along with the other aspirations of Hollywood, has come the pretension to prophetic authority. The role of the journalist has incrementally changed from “seeking the truth” to “shaping perceptions.”

I think this is a good statement of the nature of the problem. Not “bias” as such. No one can cover a story without bias – one’s bias is simply where one is standing when one covers a story.

For example, my view that the SETI search and allied phenomena are “spilt religion” colours the way I would write about a story like this or this, and the one just below. But that doesn’t mean I have a vested interest in shaping your perceptions. So long as I am entitled to my own approach, you are free to think as you wish about all that. Media people have usually thought this way, in my experience, even when heavily biased.

This newer phenomenon of attempting to build an imaginary world in the viewer’s mind via one’s news coverage (propaganda) is linked to political correctness – in other words, organized lying for the express purpose of brainwashing. Fundamentally, I think, who goes into media has changed in my lifetime: The social engineer replaces the reporter.  The free Internet is one of the few defenses against that, and time and again, we can find out more from a Google search than from legacy media.

Spilt religion: Originally, T.E. Hulme’s definition of 19th century romanticism.

Spilt religion: Originally, T.E. Hulme’s definition of 19th century romanticism.

2 Replies to “Media: It isn’t bias as such that is the problem today, it is “shaping perceptions”, journalist says

  1. 1
    bornagain77 says:

    Darwinists must really hate the internet, the last bastion of a truly free press that severely compromises their ability to one-sidedly indoctrinate people as they try to do in public schools;

    1984 Apple’s Macintosh Commercial
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYecfV3ubP8

  2. 2
    kairosfocus says:

    Mrs O’Lesary:

    Maybe we should reflect on how the powers that be shaped perceptions in Plato’s Cave.

    Mebbe, even how they still do it on topics tied to origins science. (Read the context of the just linked.)

    GEM of TKI

    PS: My RX for de-spinning.

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