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If this isn’t a hoax, this African grey parrot calling the dog is astonishing

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After a while, we are told, the dog twigged to the fact that the bird wasn’t really calling him. (In fact, the bird probably has no idea what it is saying. It repeats stuff it hears a lot.)

But a commenter observed that this trick backfired in one case: “And eventually the dog grew tired of it and no longer came when anyone called.” So the dog didn’t understand what was happening either.

File:A small cup of coffee.JPG Another commenter asks, “why dont scientist investigate why these birds can talk and see if any others can?”

Ah, the News desk here can help in the meantime: Starlings in my old district in Toronto learned to sit on the telephone wires and make sounds either like wood doves or squirrels.

Why? People put out food for those creatures, but not for starlings if they could help it. The starlings were much smarter than the wood doves but not nearly as well liked.

See also: Ravens outrank monkeys in one social ability so far. And crows can play with kids’ toys, like primates.

and

See also: Matching Darwin’s “Tree of Life,” the “Tree of Intelligence” comes crashing down

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4 Replies to “If this isn’t a hoax, this African grey parrot calling the dog is astonishing

  1. 1
    bornagain77 says:

    Here is another amazing fact about song birds and parrots that recently came out:

    Newly Discovered Convergent Genetic Evolution Between Bird and Human Vocalization Poses a Severe Challenge to Common Ancestry – Casey Luskin – December 15, 2014
    Excerpt: “We’ve known for many years that the singing behavior of birds is similar to speech in humans — not identical, but similar -,,, “But we didn’t know whether or not those features were the same because the genes were also the same.”
    “Now scientists do know, and the answer is yes — birds and humans use essentially the same genes to speak.”,,,
    “there is a consistent set of just over 50 genes,,,”
    “These changes were not found in the brains of birds that do not have vocal learning and of non-human primates that do not speak,”
    So certain birds and humans use the same genes for vocalization — but those genetic abilities are absent in non-human primates and birds without vocal learning? If not derived from a common ancestor, as they clearly were not, how did the genes get there? This kind of extreme convergent genetic evolution points strongly to intelligent design.
    http://www.evolutionnews.org/2.....92041.html

    podcast – The “Big Bang” for Birds
    http://www.discovery.org/multi.....for-birds/
    Casey Luskin discusses the abrupt origin of birds (as well as the paper on convergent vocalization genes) on The Universe Next Door with Tom Woodward.

    Of related note:

    At the 17:38 minute mark of the following video, several experiments that show that some animals (such as dogs, cats, and birds) have a transcendent component to their being that is able to sense what the owner’s intentions are. (of note: reptile pets demonstrated no transcendent connection to their owners).

    The Mind Is Not The Brain – Scientific Evidence – Rupert Sheldrake – (Referenced Notes) – video
    http://vimeo.com/33479544

    Jaytee: A dog who knew when his owner was coming home – video
    https://vimeo.com/81150973

  2. 2
    Mapou says:

    BA77:

    Here is another amazing fact about song birds and parrots that recently came out:

    Newly Discovered Convergent Genetic Evolution Between Bird and Human Vocalization Poses a Severe Challenge to Common Ancestry – Casey Luskin – December 15, 2014
    Excerpt: “We’ve known for many years that the singing behavior of birds is similar to speech in humans — not identical, but similar -,,, “But we didn’t know whether or not those features were the same because the genes were also the same.”
    “Now scientists do know, and the answer is yes — birds and humans use essentially the same genes to speak.”,,,
    “there is a consistent set of just over 50 genes,,,”
    “These changes were not found in the brains of birds that do not have vocal learning and of non-human primates that do not speak,”
    So certain birds and humans use the same genes for vocalization — but those genetic abilities are absent in non-human primates and birds without vocal learning? If not derived from a common ancestor, as they clearly were not, how did the genes get there? This kind of extreme convergent genetic evolution points strongly to intelligent design.

    Amazing indeed. This effectively and completely kills the fruitcake Darwinian theory of evolution.

    PS. This kind of stuff should be front page news. But in a world of fruitcakes and gutless liars, only the lies win out. But not for long.

  3. 3
    Robert Byers says:

    It is suggestive that if you need the genes you got them. Unrelated to common descent byt rather to common design. Also very adaptive.
    Anyways this is all about memory or rather triggering mechanisms for the memory. Not smart verses dumb animals. in fact the genes probably just show how the triggering mechanism is working. All creatures could talk in like manner after crossing some threshold that changes the triggering mechanism.

  4. 4
    polistra says:

    Neither side is hugely surprising.

    African grays clearly do more than tape recording. That’s been well established. They have language.

    And most dogs can easily tell the difference between The Master’s Voice and a recording. Most likely they’re picking up mental intention and breath smell and sound all at once, with sound less important than the other two factors.

    I’d guess that Max is not very responsive to ANY signal, judging by the huge variety of calling methods that the parrot was able to record!

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