Exoplanets Extraterrestrial life Intelligent Design

Rob Sheldon dumps cold water on the “planetary autopsy” that says ET life is common

Sheldon: I would argue that this is a very weak argument, mostly trying to jazz up a very boring data set or at least distract the audience from remembering the “standard candle” Nobel Prize assumed that all white dwarfs were identical. Either way, its a preposterous story attempting to distract from its most distressing results.

Extraterrestrial life Intelligent Design

At Scientific American: We did find life on Mars in the ‘70s. Rob Sheldon weighs in

Levin: When the Viking Molecular Analysis Experiment failed to detect organic matter, the essence of life, however, NASA concluded that the LR had found a substance mimicking life, but not life. Inexplicably, over the 43 years since Viking, none of NASA’s subsequent Mars landers has carried a life detection instrument to follow up on these exciting results.

Extraterrestrial life Intelligent Design

Once upon a time, Venus (might have) had life, say researchers

The finding “flies in the face of conventional notions of habitability, which state that Venus’ orbit places it beyond the inner edge of our Sun’s habitable zone (HZ). Within this “Venus Zone”, according to conventional wisdom, a planet absorbs too much solar radiation to ever be able to maintain liquid water on its surface. But as Way indicated, their simulations all indicated otherwise.”

Exoplanets Extraterrestrial life Intelligent Design

Rob Sheldon: Don’t give up all ET hope due to recent exoplanet disappointment

Sheldon: … in our own solar system, Saturn is far outside the “Goldilocks Zone” yet it has a moon, Enceladus, that is emitting steam jets filled with hydrocarbons. … The danger of being overly-quantitative is not just the overreliance on models, or the higher risk of failure, but rather the real probability that “certainty” blinds one from observing the actual phenomenon.