Genomics

Most life forms show S pattern in chromosome lengths, guess which one doesn’t?

From “Chromosomes’ Big Picture: Similarities Found in Genomes Across Multiple Species; Platypus Still out of Place” (ScienceDaily, July 11, 2011), we learn: “Basically what this all means is that if the chromosome number of a species can be given, the relative sizes of all the chromosomes can instantly be known,” Yu said. “Also, if you Read More…

Evolution Genomics

Genome duplication and the limits of evolution

“Genome Duplication Encourages Rapid Adaptation of Plants” (ScienceDaily, May 4, 2011) While nearly all animals have two sets of chromosomes — one set inherited from the maternal parent and the other inherited from the paternal parent — many plants are polyploids, meaning they have four or more chromosome sets. “Some botanists have wondered if polyploids Read More…

Genomics

“Evolution,” we are told, “can cause a rapid reduction in genome size”

From the Max Planck Institute, we learn (April 21, 2011): Despite being closely related to the lyre-leaved rock cress, the thale cress has a considerably smaller genomeIt would appear reasonable to assume that two closely related plant species would have similar genetic blueprints. However, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, Read More…

Genomics Intelligent Design

Should we always say it twice?: Identical twins are not really identical

From “No Two of Us Are Alike — Even Identical Twins: Pinpointing Genetic Determinants of Schizophrenia”, (ScienceDaily, March 28, 2011) we learn Singh looked at about one million markers of identical twins (and their two parents) where only one twin had schizophrenia. “The most informative feature of schizophrenia is that it sometimes runs in the Read More…

Darwinism Genomics

Diversity driven by imprinting, not selfish gene?

In this article in The Scientist, “Imprinting Diversity”, Cristina Luiggi interviews Joachim Messing about ways in which genomic imprinting may be a strong driver of diversity: Sexual reproduction yields offspring with two copies of the same gene, one from each parent; but in an epigenetic phenomenon known as genomic imprinting, only one copy of certain Read More…

Genomics

Coffee!!: Sound of bubble bursting – getting real about genomic medicine

From ScienceDaily (Feb. 18, 2011) this news, “Promise of Genomics Research Needs a Realistic View, Experts Urge” Unrealistic expectations about genomic medicine have created a “bubble” that needs deflating before it puts the field’s long term benefits at risk, four policy experts write in the current issue of the journal Science. Ten years after the Read More…

Creationism Darwinism Evolutionary biology Genomics

Sanford’s pro-ID thesis supported by PNAS paper, read it and weep, literally

Cornell Geneticist John Sanford argued that Darwinism is wrong because the rate of genetic deterioration is so high that natural selection could not arrest it. If natural selection cannot arrest genetic deterioration, how then could it be the mechanism for evolutionary improvement? Sanford predicted through his research that human genome is deteriorating. This was a Read More…

Genomics Informatics Intelligent Design

A simple statistical test for the alleged “99% genetic identity” between humans and chimps

Typical figures published in the scientific literature for the percentage similarities between the genomes of human beings (Homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) range from 95% to 99%. However, in press releases intended for popular consumption, evolutionary biologists frequently claim that human and chimpanzee genomes are 99% identical. Skeptics of neo-Darwinian evolution have repeatedly punctured Read More…