Darwinism Naturalism Religion Science science education

Are people today more religious than in the past?

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David Breitenbeck
David Breitenbeck

If the measure is blind belief, maybe so:

Darwin, for instance, is part of the House of Progress, which is why so many people will accuse you of being a creationist if you offer any criticism of his theory of Natural Selection (amusingly, this happens even to atheists). He was “right,” you see, so any opposition to him or any doubts as to his theory must be mere unthinking reactions.

Likewise, look at the treatment of scientists who question the extent, cause, or proper response to climate change: they are simply labeled “deniers” and dismissed, rather than engaged. You see? In the Middle Ages, educated men disputed each other by putting their opponent’s case in the strongest possible light before answering it. In the postmodern age, we fortunate recipients of universal education and an expensive college degree can only paste “not to be listened to” labels on our opponents. David Breitenbeck, “Why Our Day Is Far More Religious Than The Middle Ages Was” at The Federalist

Fewer people doubt outdated Darwinian shibboleths today than doubted miracle stories in the Middle Ages.

The education establishment wouldn’t be allowed to teach string theory in the schools today the way they teach Darwinism but then they already have Darwinism as one of those shibboleths no one dare question even though its evidence base is under siege.

Graduation certificates are so much easier to mass produce when the quality tested is the repetition of unexamined statements.

Breitenbeck is the author of The Wisdom of Walt Disney

See also: J. P. Moreland’s new book on scientism is out From the publisher: Rather than leading to a deeper understanding of our universe, this worldview actually undermines real science and marginalizes morality and religion.

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