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Darwinian philosopher (so he describes himself) Michael Ruse has a new book out on the Gaia hypothesis

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Here.

In 1965 English scientist James Lovelock had a flash of insight: the Earth is not just teeming with life; the Earth, in some sense, is life. He mulled this revolutionary idea over for several years, first with his close friend the novelist William Golding, and then in an extensive collaboration with the American scientist Lynn Margulis. In the early 1970s, he finally went public with the Gaia hypothesis, the idea that everything happens for an end: the good of planet Earth. Lovelock and Margulis were scorned by professional scientists, but the general public enthusiastically embraced Lovelock and his hypothesis. People joined Gaia groups; churches had Gaia services, sometimes with new music written especially for the occasion. There was a Gaia atlas, Gaia gardening, Gaia herbs, Gaia retreats, Gaia networking, and much more. And the range of enthusiasts was—and still is—broad. …

Range includes everyone but fans of common sense.

(Darwinism won’t make it any dumber. If you can’t tell the difference between life and non-life, why are you in biology?)

5 Replies to “Darwinian philosopher (so he describes himself) Michael Ruse has a new book out on the Gaia hypothesis

  1. 1
    bornagain77 says:

    Semi related note:

    William Lane Craig is called ‘Probably The World’s Most Hated Christian Philosopher On Earth’,,,

    Craig Responds “Wow, “the most hated Christian philosopher on Earth!” That’s quite a label! I think that the next time I have a speaking engagement, I’ll ask to be introduced by that title!
    http://www.reasonablefaith.org.....hilosopher

    In the old days the pagans would have just fed him to the lions and called it a day.

    Verse:

    John 15:18
    “If the world hates you, keep in mind that it hated me first.

  2. 2
    Axel says:

    ‘cos life’s just an artefact of sumfink physical.

  3. 3
    Axel says:

    Like wot mind is.

  4. 4
    tarmaras says:

    This idea is not even an original one. In the Bhagavata Purana, in ancient India, Bhumi, the angelic entity responsible for Earth appears to feel everything that happens on the planet and represents the planet in front of the superior cosmic administrators and, ultimately, to God. I just love it how these scientists/writers are so culturally cloistered sometimes that they don’t even know their hypothesis already exists in another culture.

  5. 5
    Kajdron says:

    the idea that everything happens for an end: the good of planet Earth.
    This sounds to me more (pan-)theistic than Darwinian.

    And what is the good for planet Earth? Mars and Venus are lingering around in our solar system about as long as Earth, without life (and without being ‘infected by homo sapiens’ as some envirementalists would say ;)).

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