Darwinism News

Darwinism proved! Hawaiian crickets converge on no chirp

Spread the love

Here.

The killer flies have an unusual ability to pinpoint a cricket’s location using sound.

After finding its victim – a male cricket, singing to attract a mate – a pregnant fly will spray baby maggots onto the cricket’s back, which burrow in, feed, and emerge a week later leaving the husk of the hapless cricket behind.

The presence of these North American flies placed the crickets, themselves relatively recent arrivals from Australia, under pressure to adapt.

In less than 20 generations, a mutation that leaves males unable to sing spread to over 90% of the crickets on the island of Kauai. More.

Astounding proof of Darwinism if all you want is no function.

14 Replies to “Darwinism proved! Hawaiian crickets converge on no chirp

  1. 1
    bornagain77 says:

    “In less than 20 generations”

    Could it be ‘preprogrammed’ phenotypic plasticity?

    Here is a more dramatic example of rapid adaptation:

    Phenotypic Plasticity – Lizard cecal valve (cyclical variation)- video
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEtgOApmnTA

    Lizard Plasticity – March 2013
    Excerpt: So in this study, plasticity experiments were conducted. When the lizards were taken off a plant diet and returned to their native insect diet, the cecal valves in their stomachs began to revert within weeks. As the authors conclude, this pointed heavily to plasticity as a cause. We can infer that the this gut morphology likewise arose in similar fashion when coming into contact with the plant diet.
    http://biota-curve.blogspot.co.....icity.html

  2. 2
    ppolish says:

    Quiet crickets already existed on the islands. They were not eaten and multiplied.

    I see extinction, but where is the evolution?

  3. 3
    Mung says:

    The presence of these North American flies placed the crickets, themselves relatively recent arrivals from Australia, under pressure to adapt.

    And so adapt they did. Miraculous.

    And the god of that island tired of the endless chirping of the crickets and so sent forth flies. And thus did the crickets of that island learn to keep their mating calls to themselves.

    But really, when you’re dealing with infinite population sizes, who cares if a few get eaten?

  4. 4
    ppolish says:

    Ms Zuk discusses her cricket study at about 10mins. Turns out the flys have cricket ears. That may be convergent evo? Quiet crickets surviving on 2 islands is hardly convergent I would think….http://breakingbio.com/2014/01.....rlene-zuk/

  5. 5
    bornagain77 says:

    Thanks ppolish!,,,

    as a side note, I’ve always thought the world be far more like a horror film if we were the size of insects. I mean just imagine having to deal with a preying mantis or scorpion if they were the same size as we are.

    ,,, dang someone has beat me to it:

    Attack of the Giant Leeches (1959)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L.....sect_films

  6. 6
    wd400 says:

    PPolish,

    The paper is here, the two islands have different mutations which arose seperately and recently.

  7. 7
    VunderGuy says:

    @wd400

    “the two islands have different mutations which arose separately and recently.”

    Or… such variation already existed in the population before hand and there wasn’t enough done to find out that variation, which people are now beginning to notice.

  8. 8
    ppolish says:

    Flatwings are present on the Big Island now. Now that we are looking. 2% of Big Island crickets are currently flatwing. I predict Evolution coming. I smell Convergence.

    I predict some Randomness coming to Big Island.

  9. 9
    ppolish says:

    How did the flys get cricket ears on their bodies (cricket style) instead of fly antennae on their heads (fly style)?

    THAT is a cool trick. Cooler than flatwings multiplying as nonflatwings get eaten.

    The fly larvae grow inside the cricket. Did the fly get their cricket ears there/then?

    Are sapiens becoming fat cows because of their diet?

  10. 10
    wd400 says:

    VunderGuy,

    Not likely – Zuk looked at wings on all islands quite closely and prior to the arrivial of the flies silent males would have a hard time reproducing.

  11. 11
    VunderGuy says:

    @wd00″Not likely – Zuk looked at wings on all islands quite closely and prior to the arrivial of the flies silent males would have a hard time reproducing.”

    Ah, so you admit that that the mutation was present in the population prior to this sudden jump in mutant numbers, then.

  12. 12
    wd400 says:

    No, Zuk looked for flatwings in Oahu and didn’t find them till 95. It’s hard to imagine flatwings having much of a presence prior to the fly’s arrival because of the mating call.

  13. 13
    ppolish says:

    Wd400, in the video I posted Dr Zuk suggests the mutation was “burbling along at a very low level” and you would not be looking for it. She continues “the mutation could have knocked back, knocked back” but there all along.

    Maybe it was a vestigal organ:) And I will venture to guess additional flatwings will show up in other populations now that they are famous.

  14. 14
    wd400 says:

    It’s not possible to rule out that flatwinged crickets were always there are very rare (or mutating into existence and dropping back out) but it’s clear from this research that two separate mutations are responsible for the trait in the different islands.

    It remains true that the island have different mutations which arose separately and recently.

Leave a Reply