Evolution Intelligent Design

A new theory about how ancient life forms crossed the sea on rafts

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Driftwood rafts can apparently last as long as 20 years:

We found that the floating wood and its crinoid [sea lily] cargo would have been able to last for at least 15 years and maybe up to 20 years before the log would begin to sink or break up. There is evidence from museum collections of fragments of wood with entire, fully grown crinoids attached to them that could only have resulted from this kind of collapse …

We found that the crinoids do indeed hang suspended underneath the driftwood, but clustered towards one end of it. Although difficult to observe in the original fossils, the pattern resembles that of other modern rafting species such as goose barnacles. They tend to inhabit the area at the back of a raft where there is least resistance, which can tell us the direction of travel of the colony across the ocean.

Aaron W Hunter, “Ancient sea creatures spent years crossing the ocean on rafts – we’ve worked out how it was possible” at The Conversation (August 10, 2020)

And, of course, small life forms would cling to and travel with the crinoids, wherever they drifted.

These are crinoids:

9 Replies to “A new theory about how ancient life forms crossed the sea on rafts

  1. 1
    Querius says:

    So, awesome!

    They tend to inhabit the area at the back of a raft where there is least resistance, which can tell us the direction of travel of the colony across the ocean.

    Least resistance? Resistance to what?

    What about this idea: Crinoid eggs and larvae tending to lodge at the stern of the floating mat as the mat is being blown along by wind?

    -Q

  2. 2
    martin_r says:

    to Seversky, JVL and co.

    Talking about rafting …

    have you heard about this Darwinian fairy tale ?

    from BBC:

    “Monkeys suddenly appeared in South America about 40 million years ago. Unlikely though it may seem, they probably sailed there from Africa”

    Yes!!! This is not a hoax, this is what all Darwinians are forced to believe !

    http://www.bbc.com/earth/story.....th-america

    PS: i like this part of the title “unlikely though it may seem…”
    that is OK, the whole Darwinian evo theory screams “unlikely though it may seem…” :)))

  3. 3
    Truthfreedom says:

    Martin_r

    Monkeys suddenly appeared in South America about 40 million years ago. Unlikely though it may seem, they probably sailed there from Africa.

    The Titanic maybe?

  4. 4
    polistra says:

    Spontaneous rafts can last a lot longer than that. Several ponds in New England have floating islands that have been drifting around for hundreds of years. Before urbanization, the Yangtze had floating islands that supported villages, and were poled upstream and drifted downstream like barges.

  5. 5
    Querius says:

    Polistra,

    Interesting, I’d never heard of floating villages before, but it makes sense.

    Darn it, Martin_r, I can’t seem to erase the bizarre mental image of African monkeys sailing in dinghies across the Atlantic. They’re wearing little sailor caps and shirts. 😉

    -Q

  6. 6
    martin_r says:

    Querius @5

    Sailing monkeys …

    of course, Darwinians will argue, that oceans / continents looked different 40 mil. years ago. Lots of islands where sailing monkey could anchor overnight, drink some beer and next day continue with the trip …

  7. 7
    Truthfreedom says:

    Martin_r

    Sailing monkeys …

    of course, Darwinians will argue, that oceans / continents looked different 40 mil. years ago. Lots of islands where sailing monkey could anchor overnight, drink some beer and next day continue with the trip …

    Lol.

    Anything passes as science today. Philosophical illiteracy is a killer.

    That’s why people believe in the “natural selection” “goddess”. They have transformed one epistemological tool into a metaphysics.

  8. 8
    polistra says:

    Pictures of both forms of floating island:

    http://polistrasmill.blogspot......uages.html

    http://polistrasmill.blogspot......-show.html

    I was wondering if the fungi that link the trees together had figured out how to “row” the island with cilia or pseudopods. It would be an interesting question to investigate.

  9. 9
    Querius says:

    Very cool, Polistra.

    Thanks!

    -Q

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