Evolution Intelligent Design

“Primordial hyper eye”? It sounds like science fiction. But it’s not. Read on.

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If it holds up, shouldn’t this kill Darwinism right away? Each of the ancient 200 large lenses has its own compound eye?

Trilobites of the suborder Phacopina had a unique eye in which about 200 large lenses in each eye spanned at least six individual facets, each of which in turn formed its own small compound eye.

An international research team has found an eye system in trilobites of the suborder Phacopina from the Devonian (390 million years B.P.) that is unique in the animal kingdom: each of the about 200 lenses of a hyper-facet eye spans a group of six normal compound-eye-facets, forming a compound eye itself.

University of Cologne, “Primordial ‘hyper-eye’ discovered” at ScienceDaily (September 30, 2021)

Shouldn’t people be ashamed to believe that all this happens just by natural selection acting on random mutation, as some sort of dogma?

The paper is open access.

3 Replies to ““Primordial hyper eye”? It sounds like science fiction. But it’s not. Read on.

  1. 1
    polistra says:

    Imagine the neural circuitry that coordinates all of these segments into a usable image of the world.

  2. 2
    martin_r says:

    Polistra …

    Imagine the neural circuitry that coordinates all of these segments into a usable image of the world.

    Biologists, natural science graduates, they don’t care … thank God, these romantics have their evolutionary theory, so problem solved ….

  3. 3
    martin_r says:

    talking about compound eye, let me add the following:

    From PNAS:

    Molecular phylogenetic evidence for the independent evolutionary origin of an arthropod compound eye

    … These results illustrate exactly why arthropod compound eye evolution has remained controversial, because one of two seemingly very unlikely evolutionary histories must be true. Either compound eyes with detailed similarities evolved multiple times in different arthropod groups or compound eyes have been lost in a seemingly inordinate number of arthropod lineages.

    https://www.pnas.org/content/99/3/1426

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