Extraterrestrial life

If life were common in the universe, that would point to design

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Overcoming so many hurdles for so many life forms would surely require intelligence:

A recent analysis says that life is common in the universe but intelligence—not so much. Let’s explore the reasoning…

For example, we don’t know that Earth-like planets are even common. The best argument for that view is the “Copernican Principle”—the mere statement that: “all large regions of the universe should be pretty much identical to each others… Biology has adopted a similar viewpoint, now recognizing that the physical processes which control (and formed) humanity must be basically identical to those that are at work in all other known lifeforms.” (Thoughtco)

But we don’t know that Earth is just another planet; the Principle assumes so.

Earth’s many unusual features that appear very well adapted to life (as we understand it) are unlikely to be found together in many venues the universe unless a Program exists for developing life. Thus, if the Copernican Principle is correct, it points to a superintelligence beyond the universe that developed the astonishing fine-tuning program. If life or intelligent life are not common in the universe (the rare Earth hypothesis), a superintelligence may or may not exist. The rareness of Earth doesn’t rule that out; it merely creates a question.

News, “Is life common or rare in the universe?” at Mind Matters News

Further reading:

Tales of an invented god The most important characteristic of an AI cult is that its gods (Godbots?) will be created by the AI developers and not the other way around.

6 Replies to “If life were common in the universe, that would point to design

  1. 1
    FourFaces says:

    Even if there were no lifeforms in this universe, it would still be design, the design of the universe.

  2. 2
    AaronS1978 says:

    Yeah it can be interpreted both ways pretty easily just as easily as it can be interpreted as evolution

    My dad always said this and I actually kind of agree with him even though I don’t

    But he firmly believes that there’s life everywhere else in the universe because why would God create this giant huge universe and not fill it with life

  3. 3
    Seversky says:

    This is an unimaginably vast universe, the great majority of which is implacably hostile to human life. If it was designed, it really doesn’t look like the designer had us in mind.

  4. 4
    FourFaces says:

    Seversky,

    So the universe evolved via some kind of stochastic evolution powered by the self-creation of a few classes of zillions of identical particles? Assuming that self-creation is plausible (it’s actually Darwinist magic), do you Darwinists/atheists even understand the meaning of the curse of dimensionality or are you possessed by a lying spirit aka the Devil? Just asking. 😀

  5. 5
    polistra says:

    “Life sometimes develops intelligence” made sense 50 years ago. Now we know a LOT more about the intelligence of bacteria and mitochondria and plants, and the separate intelligences of dendrites and axons collaborating to form the intelligence of each neuron. Life and intelligence are synonyms.

    The closest valid statement from current knowledge would be “Some forms of life may develop somewhat more complex intelligence than other forms of life.”

  6. 6
    Fasteddious says:

    The Copernican principle is just a wishful assumption of anti-theists, who latch onto anything they can to discount theism, whether it makes sense or not.
    As for the vast expanse of the universe, there are various explanations why God would make it that way, even if we are the lone conscious entities in the vastness. First, cosmology and physics probably require a vast universe in order to generate galaxies, stars and planets, and to last long enough for intelligent life to arise and flourish.
    Secondly, one human brain is probably more complex than an entire galaxy and perhaps God is more interested in complexity and what it (we) can do rather than vast empty spaces and trillions of similar stars. Each of the more than 30 billion humans who have existed is/was a unique being, which may fascinate God.
    Finally (for now), perhaps each galaxy has (or had, or will have) only one intelligent species to keep them separate from each other and able to develop independently – a grand cosmological experiment. Always fun to speculate…

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