Human evolution News

Human brain and muscle strength evolution intertwined?

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Further to Metabolome: A big difference between humans and monkeys, we learn at Phys.org:

Genomes, including the human genome, accumulate changes steadily over time. Among the genetic changes that have happened over the course of human evolution, only a few might be responsible for the rise of distinct human features. To determine what other molecules played a role in human evolution, scientists began to look beyond the genome. The international team of scientists, led by Dr Philipp Khaitovich from Shanghai, examined for the first time the evolution of the human metabolome – the compendium of metabolites present in human tissues. “Metabolites are more dynamic than the genome and they can give us more information about what makes us human”, says Khaitovich. “It is also commonly known that the human brain consumes way more energy than the brains of other species; we were curious to see which metabolic processes this involves.”

Indeed, it turned out that unlike the uniformly-paced evolution of the genome, the metabolome of the human brain has evolved four times faster than that of the chimpanzee. What was more surprising, however, is that human muscle accumulated an even higher amount of metabolic change – ten times that of the chimpanzee! More.

As I noted here:

The above is only a selection from the claims advanced for one isolated hook or another on which key parts of our fragile humanity are said to suspend. A vast, interlocking pattern of timed hooks forming a design would better account for the evidence, but it wouldn’t be Darwin. Darwinian theory, by its very nature, demands this zealous emphasis on isolated, randomly generated characteristics or events — warring trivia, basically. More.

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7 Replies to “Human brain and muscle strength evolution intertwined?

  1. 1
    bornagain77 says:

    News, for some reason I thought of you when I saw this:

    The 20 Largest Animals in the World – photos
    http://heavy.com/action/action.....the-world/

  2. 2
    Dionisio says:

    It is also commonly known that the human brain consumes way more energy than the brains of other species;

    Does that assume we use our brains for serious intensive/extensive challenging thinking? Does frivolous use of Facebook and twitter qualify as serious intensive/extensive challenging thinking? 😉

  3. 3
    Dionisio says:

    What was more surprising, however, is that human muscle accumulated an even higher amount of metabolic change – ten times that of…

    More surprising to whom? Did someone expect different results? Why?

  4. 4
    Barb says:

    More surprising to whom? Did someone expect different results? Why?
    I think the answer to this is “because evolution”.

  5. 5
    Dionisio says:

    Barb,
    Yes, you’re right. Thank you.
    Apparently that’s why they are surprised so often lately. Pathetically bizarre pseudo-science, isn’t it?
    Really disappointing 🙁
    Looking at the fast pace scientific research is producing so many interesting reports lately, the number and frequency of the pseudo-science surprises should continue to increase.
    And that shouldn’t be surprising to the rest of us 😉
    Have a good day.

  6. 6
    Barb says:

    “Genomes, including the human genome, accumulate changes steadily over time.”

    This statement relies on an a priori assumption that evolutionary theory is true.

    “Among the genetic changes that have happened over the course of human evolution, only a few might be responsible for the rise of distinct human features.”

    See above. Here’s the real problem: a priori, from Latin, is an assumption that is true without further proof or need to prove it. It is assumed the sun will come up tomorrow. However, it has a negative side: an a priori assumption made without question on the basis that no analysis or study is necessary, can be mental laziness when the reality is not so certain.

    Mental laziness has no place in modern science.

    “…the metabolome of the human brain has evolved four times faster than that of the chimpanzee. What was more surprising, however, is that human muscle accumulated an even higher amount of metabolic change – ten times that of the chimpanzee!”

    This wouldn’t be surprising if the researchers acknowledged that humans aren’t related to chimpanzees.

  7. 7
    VunderGuy says:

    Technically, aren’t we, in fact, related to every other contingent, embodied creature? I mean, in genesis, it says that all creatures were made out of the same and/or similar materials that were most likely present on the early earth.

    I think what you mean by related is that, the only common ancestor we share with chimps is the creator Himself.

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