Human evolution

The Smithsonian offers us ten new lessons about human origins

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and here is the first:

In December, the longest trackway of fossil human footprints was announced by Matthew R. Bennett and colleagues. The 11,500- to 13,000-year-old, 0.8 mile-long (1.3 km) trackway, roughly the length of 14 football fields, was made by a woman or a juvenile male, holding a two- to three-year-old toddler while on their journey through a rough and dangerous landscape.

How do we know? Every so often the adult footprints pause and are joined by a child’s footprints. The footprints go in a straight and definite line, and pretty fast, indicating a deliberate end target; they then return in the opposite direction, this time without the child.

Ella Beaudoin, Briana Pobiner , “Ten things we learned about human origins in 2020” at Smithsonian Magazine

Maybe more of this is what we need, to make some sense of our heritage.

2 Replies to “The Smithsonian offers us ten new lessons about human origins

  1. 1
    polistra says:

    Nice painting but the author is an idiot. She blames the “virus” for the gibbering insanity created by psychopathic demons. Scientists are supposed to DOUBT murderous theories screeched by mad genocidal cult leaders, not blindly obey cult leaders. The German scientists who blindly obeyed Hitler and helped to run his “experiments” are not respected today, to put it mildly.

  2. 2
    mahuna says:

    Fathers stand behind their adventuring children to catch them if they fall.

    Mothers stand in front of their adventuring children to whack chipmunks who they perceive to represent a threat.

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