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An editor and journalist reflects on the absurdity of naturalism

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From Ken Francis, journalism prof and author of The Little Book of God, Mind, Cosmos and Truth, via a road trip through the United States, New English Review:

On the Reagan road trip, there are many fond memories beneath those soulful, Doo-wop skies over the vast desert plains off Route 66. Driving into the night, with the car window rolled down and the radio playing A Thousand Miles Away by the Heartbeats, the fragrance of the desert breeze was enough to induce slumber. What did a tiny spec of metal automobile, crawling slowly below on the desert floor, like a nocturnal lightning bug, look like from the night splendor of those starry constellations? A sky where the vastness of God’s Milky Way can be seen in all its miraculous glory. No smoke from factories or other pollution to spoil the view. Such a kaleidoscope is enough to trigger a seizure of vertigo. And no other landscape or skyscape could evoke such feelings of calm and awe. Back then in my Godless youth, the whole experience should’ve been nothing more than a Westworld robot gazing at the light of distant, uncreated nuclear fusion. But I must’ve intuitively believed in a Divine Creator. How could such a wonderful sight be nothing more than a cosmic ocean of meaningless particles flowing endlessly into the abyss? More.

Absurd, yes But it is increasingly useful for governments if the public believes there is nothing out there or inside us that judges or even can judge government actions.

See also: Explaining ethics to naturalists is like explaining epiphenomenalism to a dead horse

and

Can science survive long in a post-modern world? It’s not clear.

2 Replies to “An editor and journalist reflects on the absurdity of naturalism

  1. 1

    “Can science survive long in a post-modern world?”

    Empirical science will survive the irrationality of post-modernism, but its advocates will likely be forced underground until the lunacy subsides…which may be awhile.

  2. 2
    Seversky says:

    As an a/mat I can feel the same sense of wonder and awe when I look up at what I can see of the Universe, not that I can see as much as used to be the case. I can look at hundreds of tiny, white smudges in a photograph of the distant reaches of the Universe and, in my imagination, try to grasp that each smudge is an entire galaxy, not as it is now but as it was billions of years ago. The telescope is not just looking out into space it is also looking far back in time. That photograph is a wonderful achievement in itself and is based entirely on a materialist or physicalist understanding of the Universe.

    Does that mean that I have an a/mat explanation for how I come to be conscious and able to appreciate the wonders of this Universe? No, I don’t. Nobody does. All I know is that the materialist of physicalist approach has served us well thus far so there is no good reason to abandon it just yet.

    Remember it was not so long ago that some Christians viewed the AIDS epidemic as a punishment from God visited on homosexuals for their sinful behavior. No one knew what was going on. Over time, however, materialist medical science discovered HIV, elucidated its role in the disease and has been able to develop multi-drug treatment regimes that can keep patients alive to an extent not possible just decades ago.

    Maybe there is no materialist account of consciousness or maybe there is on out there just waiting for us to connect the dots and put one together. We’ll never know if we just say that since we haven’t found one yet it isn’t possible so we should just call it a day. That’s not how you get things done.

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