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At Mind Matters News: Eric Holloway asks, Is AlphaZero Actually Superior to the Human Mind?

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He thinks that comparing AI and the human mind is completely apples and oranges:

… we all know that computer processing time is not the same as human thinking time. For example, according to the paper, AlphaZero evaluates 63 thousand moves in a second, whereas a human can only evaluate at most a couple, or not even one. Not even in the same ballpark! So once we start looking at the raw processing numbers for the AI engine, it becomes very clear that comparing AI and the human mind is completely apples and oranges.

If we were to limit AlphaZero to human level processing capabilities, it would completely flounder. What is actually remarkable is the shear amount of processing power needed to bring computers up to the level of even the most basic human player! This indicates the human mind is doing something totally different and extraordinarily more efficient than the best AI algorithms we have today.

Rather than demonstrating the superiority of algorithms over thinking, these AI game engines instead show the ever-widening gap between computation and cogitation, with the advantage clearly in the human court.

Eric Holloway, “Is AlphaZero actually superior to the human mind?” at Mind Matters News (February 28, 2022)

Takehome: What is actually remarkable is the sheer amount of processing power needed to bring computers up to the level of even the most basic human player!

2 Replies to “At Mind Matters News: Eric Holloway asks, Is AlphaZero Actually Superior to the Human Mind?

  1. 1
    BobRyan says:

    AI cannot exist. Computers are unable to lie, unlike humans. Humans can make 4+4= anything we wish. Computers only answer 8. Try to get any other answer, without being programmed to give a wrong answer, and you will always get 8. AI requires free will, which cannot be programmed.

  2. 2
    EvilSnack says:

    Future chess competitions will have more meaning if they introduce bracketing based on the amount of code and storage space the algorithm has available, so that victory is achieved with better algorithms, and not by ramping up resources.

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