Fine tuning Intelligent Design

Do galaxies retain a memory of the entire universe?

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If so, we could use our galaxy as a model:

Imagine if you could look at a snowflake at the South Pole and determine the size and the climate of all of Antarctica. Or study a randomly selected tree in the Amazon rain forest and, from that one tree—be it rare or common, narrow or wide, young or old—deduce characteristics of the forest as a whole. Or, what if, by looking at one galaxy among the hundred billion or so in the observable universe, one could say something substantial about the universe as a whole? A recent paper, whose lead authors include a cosmologist, a galaxy-formation expert, and an undergraduate named Jupiter (who did the initial work), suggests that this may be the case. The result at first seemed “crazy” to the paper’s authors. Now, having discussed their work with other astrophysicists and done various “sanity checks,” trying to find errors in their methods, the results are beginning to seem pretty clear. Francisco Villaescusa-Navarro, one of the lead authors of the work, said, “It does look like galaxies somehow retain a memory of the entire universe.”

Rivka Galchen, “What Can We Learn About the Universe from Just One Galaxy?” at The New Yorker (March 23, 2022)

If galaxies somehow retain a memory of the entire universe, the significance is probably greater than just the fact that we can use our galaxy as a model.

You may also wish to read: Templeton tries to wish away fine-tuning of the universe. So there you have it, folks. Fine-tuning is either a fluke or a multiverse. No other possibility is conceivable. Maybe science is about eliminating the concept of intelligence from the universe.

and

At Mind Matters News: Prof: Fine-tuning in nature is due to the mind of the universe Panpsychists (or cosmopsychists) are permitted to make arguments that would be banned if made by, say, intelligent design advocates. Some change is afoot.

One Reply to “Do galaxies retain a memory of the entire universe?

  1. 1
    polistra says:

    Not all that strange.

    The tree example is easy. If you can examine and understand the incoming signals and outgoing actions of one tree, you can read what the rest of the forest is doing. Fungal stolons and chemical pheromones keep all the trees in communication.

    Same with mammals. Our hippocampus contains a map of our current physical world, and our anterior cingulate gyrus has a map of our current status location in the social world.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/03/220316173259.htm

    Stars and planets have gravitational and magnetic fields that overlap and intermingle. If you know how each star moves in response to the pulls and pushes, you can tell how the pullers and pushers have moved. Simple image: watch a leaf floating in a lake, and you can read the product of incoming waves from various sources.

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