Genetics Intelligent Design Natural selection

Has a plant evolved a camouflage color to avoid humans?

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Maybe:

The plant, Fritillaria delavayi, grows on the rocky alpine slopes of China’s Hengduan Mountains, and for more than 2,000 years its dried bulbs have been used to treat heart and lung ailments. Historically, the plant was not hard to find—a bright sprig of green amid a sea of gray scree—but demand for the powder made from its bulbs has made it rarer and more expensive. A kilogram of the powder now costs $480 ($218 per pound), and requires harvesting more than 3,500 individual plants, which only begin to flower in their fifth season, according to Science News.

But just as many animals have evolved camouflage to better evade predators, human harvesting behaviors have spurred many Fritillaria plants to shift from loud greens to the muted grays and browns of the rocks they grow between, the researchers report in a study published this week in the journal Current Biology.

Alex Fox, “Medicinal Plant May Have Evolved Camouflage to Evade Humans” at Smithsonian Magazine

Paper. (open access)

But what about the possibility that the dull reddish color variant was always present—in small numbers—and simply became more common because the ones less likely to show it or pass it on were picked off. Plants often vary in color like that. So, a question: If humans stopped picking them, would the green ones just start becoming more numerous again?

3 Replies to “Has a plant evolved a camouflage color to avoid humans?

  1. 1
    AaronS1978 says:

    Well you said right away when I was already thinking, I read this article just the other day

    But remember evolution did it not the fact that natural selection works that way

    I mean quite literally that’s the only way natural selection would work but yet somehow evolution “changed” these plants

    When in reality the only thing that was left with the ones that we couldn’t see in the first place

  2. 2
    polistra says:

    Must admit I hadn’t thought of that. Makes perfect sense. We’re picking the ones we can see, so they don’t get a chance to pollinate and seed. The quiet variants get to reproduce. Selection among humans works the opposite way.

    More broadly, a LOT of the truly endangered species in recent years have been endangered by Chinese traditional medicine. EPA doesn’t complain about these species because China owns the government.

  3. 3
    AaronS1978 says:

    Oh boy, I should’ve come back and corrected but I wrote, Jesus Christ that’s bad

    Again, I could be used as a case study for how AI really screws up on language

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