Intelligent Design

Neanderthals continue to challenge evolutionary perspectives

Spread the love

Images of Neanderthal Man have changed over the years, but there has been a reluctance to portray them as our near-cousins. Neanderthals have been treated as a separate species within the Homo family, and usually described as slow and clumsy, with a limited capacity for creative thinking. The evolutionary context is typically presented in terms of Modern Man’s superiority, so that when Homo sapiens migrated from Africa into Europe, it was the Neanderthal population that died out. However, does the evolutionary approach provide the appropriate framework for understanding these events? Recent discoveries suggest that Neanderthals do not fit the descriptions found in the textbooks and the media, and that the evolutionary agenda is actually a negative influence. The presuppositions and perspectives of the evolutionists are proving to be systematically wrong. This blog draws attention to three research papers that document “surprising” findings – i.e. the conclusions run counter to evolutionary expectations.
[snip]
For more, go here.

2 Replies to “Neanderthals continue to challenge evolutionary perspectives

  1. 1
    Axel says:

    ‘systematically wrong’. Steady on!
    What a cad!

    ‘This blog draws attention to three research papers that document “surprising” findings – i.e. the conclusions run counter to evolutionary expectations.’

    OK, who’s playing Forrest? I’d better read the linked article.

    DT? I’m not saying owt about his initials….

  2. 2
    Robert Byers says:

    Its all incompetent gibberish.
    There just is so little remains of these folks in skeleton and campsites as to make the subject hopelessly speculative.
    Are these neaders really outside the spectrum of human bodies?
    I suspect modern human populations are easily within the reach of neaders in bone structures .
    Someone needs to do charts of comparison.
    In fact they are just backward tough people adapting to the new areas.
    Our bodies were more responsive back then and just as colours etc popped out easily upon migrations so slight differences in the bodies happen in segregated tough populations.

Leave a Reply