Cell biology Darwinism Intelligent Design

Paper on bacterial mobility (motility) doesn’t invoke “evolution”

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A friend notes that these biophysicists just explain what they have learned and do not gas off about Darwinian “evolution”:

Bacteria have developed a large array of motility mechanisms to exploit available resources and environments. These mechanisms can be broadly classified into swimming in aqueous media and movement over solid surfaces. Swimming motility involves either the rotation of rigid helical filaments through the external medium or gyration of the cell body in response to the rotation of internal filaments. On surfaces, bacteria swarm collectively in a thin layer of fluid powered by the rotation of rigid helical filaments, they twitch by assembling and disassembling type IV pili, they glide by driving adhesins along tracks fixed to the cell surface and, finally, non-motile cells slide over surfaces in response to outward forces due to colony growth. Recent technological advances, especially in cryo-electron microscopy, have greatly improved our knowledge of the molecular machinery that powers the various forms of bacterial motility. In this Review, we describe the current understanding of the physical and molecular mechanisms that allow bacteria to move around.

Wadhwa, N., Berg, H.C. Intro: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-021-00626-4″ target=”another”>Bacterial motility: machinery and mechanisms. Nat Rev Microbiol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41579-021-00626-4 The paper is closed access.

Which raises a question: How much outgassing about “evolution” is intended to stifle curiosity and make it sound like we know things we don’t?

2 Replies to “Paper on bacterial mobility (motility) doesn’t invoke “evolution”

  1. 1
    Bob O'H says:

    This is, quite literally, the second sentence of the first paragraph of the main text:

    To promote colonization of those environments, bacteria have evolved several motility mechanisms, which broadly fall into two classes: cells either swim freely in aqueous media; or they move in aqueous media over solid surfaces.

    With the emphasis added, obviously.

  2. 2
    Hanks says:

    bacteria have evolved several motility mechanisms

    When you read that bacteria evolved [whatever mechanism] and when bacteria looking in the mirror see bacteria then word evolve has nothing to do with common descent evolution.It’s an adaptive response that was present in that bacteria but inactivated/hidden/turned off/ in absence of certain stimuli. An air conditioning has a sensor that does not manifest until a trigger(a certain temperature,humidity,etc.) wakes it up and because you are aware of him when started that doesn’t mean wasn’t present all the time. 😉

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