Intelligent Design News Plants

Plants talk to each other. Unfortunately, when they do, they sometimes lie and defraud.

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πŸ˜‰ From ScienceDaily:

dodder weed wrecking sugar beet

Westwood examined the relationship between a parasitic plant, dodder, and two host plants, Arabidopsis and tomatoes. In order to suck the moisture and nutrients out of the host plants, dodder uses an appendage called a haustorium to penetrate the plant. Westwood has previously broken new ground when he found that during this parasitic interaction, there is a transport of RNA between the two species. RNA translates information passed down from DNA, which is an organism’s blueprint.

His new work expands this scope of this exchange and examines the mRNA, or messenger RNA, which sends messages within cells telling them which actions to take, such as which proteins to code. It was thought that mRNA was very fragile and short-lived, so transferring it between species was unimaginable.

But Westwood found that during this parasitic relationship, thousands upon thousands of mRNA molecules were being exchanged between both plants, creating this open dialogue between the species that allows them to freely communicate.

Through this exchange, the parasitic plants may be dictating what the host plant should do, such as lowering its defenses so that the parasitic plant can more easily attack it. Westwood’s next project is aimed at finding out exactly what the mRNA are saying.

And, presumably, provide talking points for the salad side.

Knowing this may help in the fight against crop weeds.

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2 Replies to “Plants talk to each other. Unfortunately, when they do, they sometimes lie and defraud.

  1. 1
    Mung says:

    I wonder though if they call it defronding.

  2. 2
    awstar says:

    Through this exchange, the parasitic plants may be dictating what the host plant should do, such as lowering its defenses so that the parasitic plant can more easily attack it. Westwood’s next project is aimed at finding out exactly what the mRNA are saying.

    The parasitic plant is probably saying something like “Did God really say …”

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