Intelligent Design Multiverse

What kind of faith does it take to believe in a multiverse?

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Physicist Brian Keating offers some thoughts:

The concept of the Multiverse is an old one, one that has been approached primarily as a matter of metaphysics or philosophy. But is it scientific? And, if it is scientific, why do so many of its most ardent supporters describe their ‘faith’ in the Multiverse? This video explores several contrasting viewpoints, from Andrei Linde to Paul Davies as well as ways to test Eternal Inflation, one of the leading theories that predicts a Multiverse.

Science on uppers.

At Evolution News and Science Today, David Klinghoffer notes:

Stephen Meyer’s Return of the God Hypothesis shows that affirming a personal God is not a matter faith alone but of evidence. On the other hand, the multiverse is nothing but unsupported belief, adopted as a defense against an inference to theism. Watch and enjoy.

David Klinghoffer, “Keating: Blind Faith in the Multiverse” at Evolution News and Science Today

See also: The Return of the God Hypothesis

7 Replies to “What kind of faith does it take to believe in a multiverse?

  1. 1
    polistra says:

    Old for sure. Here’s an episode of a sci-fi adventure program from 1952. The solar system is threatened by a black hole, called a cycloplex. When objects get near the hole, they’re sucked in and pass into another universe “or perhaps multiple universes”. The heroes rig up a giant superconducting loop magnet and send it into the hole, where it countervortexes the vortex like a hail cannon. Pretty advanced stuff for an adventure program aimed at kids.

    https://archive.org/download/OTRR_Space_Patrol_Singles/Space_Patrol_52-10-25_004_The_Hole_in_Empty_Space.mp3

  2. 2
    BobRyan says:

    It is hypothetical, which places it firmly in the realm of fiction. The difference between hypothesis and theory comes down to theory having observable and repeatable evidence. Multiverse may make for good fiction, but has no scientific merit for which to base anything.

  3. 3
    mahuna says:

    Well, gee, guys. Did you think about this AT ALL?
    Do you believe in God? Doesn’t God dwell in Heaven? Isn’t Heaven separate from Our Universe? I mean, you can’t just hire a cab and DRIVE there, right?
    In many Theologies, Hell is also a separate and distinct Universe. And so is Purgatory, if your theology posits a Purgatory.
    Or are you assuming a Cosmology where Universe 2 (or B or Kumquat) is essentially identical to Our Universe, except the dominant color is Purple instead of Blue…?

  4. 4
    asauber says:

    Mahuna,

    Ease up on the homebrew.

    “In many Theologies, Hell is also a separate and distinct Universe.”

    Depends on what the definition if Universe is. In any case, we are talking about religious faith in Multiverses, something Scientists aren’t supposed to have, or it will adversely affect their Science.

    Andrew

  5. 5
    asauber says:

    Anyway a point I’ve made a few times over the years:

    “Universe” is problematic to begin with, so “Multiverse” is just appealing to absurdity to win an argument. It’s one of the stupidest things I’ve ever seen.

    Andrew

  6. 6
    zweston says:

    I’ll bet we won’t hear a straight answer from Sev on this… unless he rejects multiverse?

  7. 7
    AaronS1978 says:

    You me the god of atheists born of comics and Star Trek capable of everything god does but doesn’t have a brain. It can make anything anywhere at anytime infinitely

    A lot

    Because I’m surprised it hasn’t blown itself up yet with all that infinite possibility and infinite time to create infinity

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