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Medicine: Sitting does not increase overall mortality risk

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From Reason:

Epidemiology Makes Astrology Look Respectable

Earlier this year, a review article in the Annals of Internal Medicine reported that among other bad outcomes found in a bunch of mostly case-control studies that sitting all day at a desk job increased your risk of dying with a hazard ratio of 1.22 and 95 percent confidence interval of 1.090 to 1.410. Time to get a desk with an attached treadmill. Well, maybe not.

Last week, a new study in the International Journal of Epidemiology that took into account the sitting habits of a cohort of British subjects for 16 years reported:

Sitting time was not associated with all-cause mortality risk. The results of this study suggest that policy makers and clinicians should be cautious about placing emphasis on sitting behaviour as a risk factor for mortality that is distinct from the effect of physical activity. More.

Actually, a great deal of published research doesn’t show what it claims to, resulting in the current controversy over the value of peer review. To keep up. See Retraction Watch.

File:A small cup of coffee.JPG Note: But then, evolutionary psychology can always be used to excuse errors in science.

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One Reply to “Medicine: Sitting does not increase overall mortality risk

  1. 1
    Robert Byers says:

    I always wonder about the competence of researchers ion saying this or that hurts the health/life span of people.
    The body is so wired to survive with its immune system and so on THAT the seeming trivial actions we take in regards to exercise SEEMING shouldn’t make a difference in or bodies. It might be a myth.
    What is being made strong by exercise? Is the glory of our system affected by running laps?

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