Astronomy News

Most distant known galaxy: 700 million years after the Big Bang

Spread the love

The team’s observations showed that z8-GND-5296 is forming stars extremely rapidly is forming stars extremely rapidly— producing each year ~300 times the mass of our sun. By comparison, the Milky Way forms only two to three stars per year. The new distance record-holder lies in the same part of the sky as the previous record-holder (redshift 7.2), which also happens to have a very high rate of star-formation.

“So we’re learning something about the distant universe,” said Steven Finkelstein at the University of Texas at Austin, who led the project. “There are way more regions of very high star formation than we previously thought. There must be a decent number of them if we happen to find two in the same area of the sky.”

One Reply to “Most distant known galaxy: 700 million years after the Big Bang

  1. 1
    tjguy says:

    This was also reported on at creation evolution headlines along with other recent scientific findings that question the evolution long age model and fit with the biblical model.

    http://crev.info/2013/10/findi.....h-genesis/

    A quote from the above review:

    Instant galaxies: The farthest and oldest galaxy yet (700 million years after the Big Bang in the secular cosmological view, or redshift 7.51) was already fully mature, creating stars hundreds of times faster than the Milky Way does (according to evolutionary dating), and is “richer in heavy elements” than expected – requiring multiple generations of stars to have formed, aged, and exploded.

    This “exceptional” galaxy so near the beginning requires secular cosmologists to invent special conditions that are not acting today;

    yet mature galaxies would be expected from Genesis 1:1.

    Sources: Nature News, Nature, Science Shot, and the BBC News: “there are already quite surprisingly evolved galaxies in the very early Universe.”

    Have cosmologists/astronomers ever found a galaxy that is in the stages of forming? Ever? Or has every galaxy they have found been mature like this one?

    Just curious. I really don’t know the answer, but a fully mature galaxy at this stage of the universe does NOT fit with theory. And, it requires special ad hoc explanations showing that big bangers have to believe in anti-scientific things to keep their model afloat.

    Could there be a problem with the Standard Model as currently accepted?

    This and other evidence make the answer clear!

    Other issues reported on in the article include origin of life problems, catastrophic geological formations that challenge uniformitarianism, and this(on the young earth core):

    Science Magazine just reported a “new core paradox” – the earth’s core is more conductive than previously thought. Implications: “The conventional view is that convection in the liquid outer core provides most of the energy for the geodynamo, and does so not just today, but also in the past, stretching backward in time for at least 3.4 billion years,” Peter Olson wrote. “Now that view is being challenged….

    As Gomer Pyle used to say,

    “Surprise, surprise, surprise!”

Leave a Reply