Peer review

One in five health care researchers pressured to change results

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By study funders. From a PLOS survey,

In the small survey of 104 researchers in fields such as nutrition, sexual health, physical activity and substance use, 18% of respondents said that they had, on at least one occasion, felt pressured by funders, the data showed.

The affected studies were published between 2007 and 2017, the researchers said.

Because of what the researchers describe as a history of interference from industry funders, such as drug companies in public health research, they expected those leading industry-funded studies to report the most attempted influence, they said.

FDA data reveals racial discrepancies in cardiovascular drug trials “But we didn’t find any instances of that,” study co-author Sam McCrabb said in a press release.

Brian P. Dunleavy, “Survey: 1 in 5 medical researchers reports pressure from funders to change study results” at UPI

The biggest offender was government, not industry or non-profits. Also:

Such interference was more common in studies on sexual health and substance abuse than those involving nutrition and physical activity, although the study does not provide reasons for this, McCrabb said.

Brian P. Dunleavy, “Survey: 1 in 5 medical researchers reports pressure from funders to change study results” at UPI

his post is dedicated to everyone who believes that more and bigger government is the answer to our problems.

3 Replies to “One in five health care researchers pressured to change results

  1. 1
    chuckdarwin says:

    That’s an awfully bold headline given 104 subjects spread over three continents engaged in a number of different areas of research. This unqualified headline is based upon reports from 18-19 researchers out of the millions of health care researchers worldwide. Instead of bashing the government, perhaps UD should be a bit more circumspect about the “research” it reports.

  2. 2
    polistra says:

    I’ve seen it happen. I was marginally involved (as programmer and technician) on a study of speech development in infants. The government funder wanted to see a difference caused by drug use by mothers. The study found no difference caused by drug use, but some difference between races. The study was halted before publication, because everyone knew what the funder DIDN’T want.

  3. 3
    Silver Asiatic says:

    For a population of 200,000 the sample size needed for a 90% confidence level is 272.
    So, 104 is not that bad.

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