Intellectual freedom Intelligent Design Philosophy Psychology

Apparently, canceling Jordan Peterson didn’t really work

Spread the love

He was under the weather for a bit but …

One of the strangest and most baffling aspects of the Peterson phenomenon has been the way in which his critics failed to contend with his points and arguments. And not just the specifics, but the fact that anybody with such a following must be onto something. Of course critics primarily on the ideological Left claimed that Peterson was some kind of fringe “alt-right” figure, against the evidence of any and all of his words. It was telling that they remained so incurious about the popularity of his work.

You would have thought that if any Canadian professor who had previously been obscure rose to prominence across the world, with audiences of thousands rising to their feet to welcome him every night, then whatever their ideological stance people — including critics — would try to work out what it was that he was onto. Yet Peterson’s critics, from Cathy Newman to the New York Times and the BBC, consistently failed to see any interest in the bigger story. They tried to bring him down, of course. They tried to portray him as some kind of monster, trip him up, laugh at him or otherwise reveal some underlying horror.

Douglas Murray, “The world needs Jordan Peterson more than ever” at Unherd

Yer news hack (O’Leary for News) won’t soon forget a University of Toronto prof’s description of the sheer hatred the Woke professoriate feels for Peterson. That he would dare have independent ideas makes them all look like what they really are…

Anyhow, get this:

Peterson watchers will also notice that he signed off by saying that “With God’s grace and mercy” he hoped to complete some of the tasks which he lays out in it. In 2017, Peterson released a set of online videos about the first book in the Bible — Genesis — and it had long been his hope that he would be able to find the time to study and prepare for a similar set of lectures on the next book, Exodus.

Douglas Murray, “The world needs Jordan Peterson more than ever” at Unherd

And now get this:

Indeed this was the primary purpose of the visiting professorship that Peterson had been awarded at the Divinity faculty at Cambridge University — an unpaid position that Peterson was looking forward to taking up until the university authorities discovered that he had once been photographed beside somebody wearing a T-shirt that said “I’m a proud Islamophobe”. I say that this was the ostensible reason, only because it was. As I wrote here at the time, it was clear that Cambridge was simply giving in to a small online mob that remained dedicated to attacking and humiliating Peterson at every turn.

Douglas Murray, “The world needs Jordan Peterson more than ever” at Unherd

Are you giving money to such institutions? Stop. They aren’t universities any more.

Hat tip: Blazing Cat Fur

and

Hat tip: Ken Francis, co-author with Theodore Dalrymple of The Terror of Existence: From Ecclesiastes to Theatre of the Absurd

2 Replies to “Apparently, canceling Jordan Peterson didn’t really work

  1. 1
    polistra says:

    Under the weather? Sounds like you’ve been sucked into his cult.

  2. 2
    News says:

    It was weather from hell, Polistra at 1. So?

Leave a Reply