Big Bang Intelligent Design Multiverse Philosophy

Yes, the Big Bang could be wrong, but what would that really mean?

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This image represents the evolution of the Universe, starting with the Big Bang. The red arrow marks the flow of time.
Big Bang/NASA

Like every “defining narrative,” the Big Bang could be wrong. But what prompts us to think it is wrong?

To modern cosmologists, the Big Bang is a model describing how the universe expanded from an extremely hot, dense early state into the reality that we see today. The evidence for this interpretation overwhelming. Certainly, nothing else has come anywhere close in the last 50 years, even as our knowledge about the universe has grown tremendously…

At the same time, it is important to be open about how much we don’t know. It is not only possible, it is absolutely certain that our understanding of the Big Bang is incomplete.

Cosmic inflation is a widely accepted theory about what happened during the first fraction of a second during the Big Bang, but it is not proven. The current dispute over the cosmic expansion rate may be a reflection of our ignorance about that early era. Why and how the Big Bang occurred are complete mysteries. You may have heard cosmologists speculate about the “multiverse,” or about the idea of an oscillating universe with many beginnings, or about a collision between two membranes of reality that created our universe. Nobody knows which of these ideas, if any, is correct. But what they all have in common is that they all accept the evidence that our current universe emerged from an intensely hot, dense early state—which is to say, they all take the Big Bang as their starting point.

Corey S. Powell, “Could the Big Bang be Wrong?” at Discover Magazine

Actually, multiverse cosmology would make a starting point irrelevant or else subject to endless redefinition. Powell’s bookmark-able summary can’t address the problem, of course, but that’s precisely what the multiverse does. Facts no longer matter much because contradictory facts have equal status. And in the current environment, that would be such welcome news to so many.

See also: Continuing efforts to erase the beginning of time

The Big Bang: Put simply,the facts are wrong.

and

The multiverse is science’s assisted suicide

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2 Replies to “Yes, the Big Bang could be wrong, but what would that really mean?

  1. 1
    Pearlman says:

    could be wrong and based on science The big bang is wrong, at least those aspects that are deep-time dependent, but the fact based parts also falsify eternal and multi-verse does not even qualify for the scientific playground.
    reference the YeC Moshe Emes series volume II ‘SPIAL cosmological redshift hypothesis and model.

  2. 2
    Axel says:

    ‘Facts no longer matter much because contradictory facts have equal status.’

    Yes. the atheists cannot accept paradoxes for what they genuinely are : mysteries… but mysteriously feel it gives them ‘carte blanche’ to postulate oxymorons : mysteries repugnant to logic, but gratuitous in that they are pure fancy, not founded on empirical evidence or mathematics, ergo not paradoxes in the sense of mysteries that happen to have been confirmed to be true. It is all contained in their oft-evoked ‘counter-intutitiveness’, cited in relation to a totally unsupported thesis totally repugnant to logic. .

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