Evolution News speciation

Nile crocodiles swam to Caribbean?

In “Nile crocodile is two species” (Nature, September 14, 2011), Ed Yong reports, he iconic Nile crocodile actually comprises two different species — and they are only distantly related. The large east African Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is in fact more closely related to four species of Caribbean crocodile than to its small west African Read More…

Intelligent Design speciation

Speciation: More new species discovered – really?

At Eurekalert ( 7-Jul-2011), we learn: Jewel beetles, obtained from local people, turn out to be 4 species unknown to science A team of researchers from the Czech University of Life Sciences discovered four new species of jewel beetles (Buprestidae) from South-eastern Asia. This family of beetles is named for their particularly beautiful body and Read More…

speciation

Karl Giberson and Francis Collins explain how Canadians can become a separate species

In The Language of Science and Faith, (IVP Books, 2011) explaining how microevolution can become macroevolution, they explain, If a population of some species undergoes a substantial number of such changes [genetic mutations], it can eventually turn into a new species, a process called speciation. Usually speciation requires that the population be geographically isolated from Read More…

speciation

How many species are there, really?

In “Rewriting the textbooks: Noah’s shrinking ark” (part of a series on stuff in the textbooks that could use an airbrush), Kate Douglas (New Scientist, 23 May 2011) tackles the tangled problem of species, supposedly standing at 30 million, which she describes as “almost certainly a huge overestimate.” So not much is systematic apart from Read More…

speciation

Awesome powers of common shrew or weakening powers of current classification?

This New Scientist article (Michael Marshall, 28 April 2011)  on the interbreeding of shrews despite the fact that their chromosomes have been rearranged does not use  the “biological species concept”  (it’s hard to know how to do so under the circumstances). Stuck for a term, Marshall calls the differently arranged groups “races” instead. Anyway, Searle Read More…

speciation Uncommon Descent Contest

Uncommon Descent Contest Question 21 reposted What if Darwin’s theory only works 6 percent of the time?

(Note: There was a problem posting entry comments to the original post, so I am reposting this – I think, very interesting – question to give others a chance. I have posted a link from the previous post to this one for purposes of entry. All previous entries will be judged, so no need to Read More…

speciation Uncommon Descent Contest

Uncommon Descent Contest Question 21: What if Darwin’s theory only works 6 percent of the time?

(Note: There was a problem posting entry comments here, so this contest has been reposted: Go here to enter. All previous entries will be judged, so no need to repost.) Here’s an interesting article in New Scientist by Bob Holmes on a new approach to how animals become separate species (“Accidental origins: Where species come Read More…

speciation

Speciation: Or maybe not?

At Wired Science, we are informed “Birth of New Species Witnessed by Scientists” (November 16, 2009): On one of the Galapagos islands whose finches shaped the theories of a young Charles Darwin, biologists have witnessed that elusive moment when a single species splits in two. In many ways, the split followed predictable patterns, requiring a Read More…