Design inference News

When organized crime got ID?

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File:A small cup of coffee.JPG Here, according to a friend:

Abstract. This paper describes the forensic analysis of what the authors believe to be the most sophisticated smart card fraud encountered to date. In 2010, Murdoch et al. [7] described a man-in-the-middle attack against EMV cards. [7] demonstrated the attack using a general purpose FPGA board, noting that “miniaturization is mostly a mechanical challenge, and well within the expertise of criminal gangs”. This indeed happened in 2011, when about 40 sophisticated card forgeries surfaced in the field.

These forgeries are remarkable in that they embed two chips wired top-to-tail. The first chip is clipped from a genuine stolen card. The second chip plays the role of the man-in-the-middle and communicates directly with the point of sale (PoS) terminal. The entire assembly is embedded in the plastic body of yet another stolen card. The forensic analysis relied on X-ray chip imaging, side-channel analysis, protocol analysis, and microscopic optical inspections.

Not sure I (O’Leary for News) quite get it, unless the point is, that couldn’t all be an accident.

Unless, of course, one believes that thought is a user illusion anyway—just the way selfish genes spread. But then how would anyone know?

There always needs to be someone whose knowledge is in fact an intelligent commentary for a naturalist theory of mind to be valid, which means by definition that it isn’t.

Anyway, no one can think up a lock someone else can’t but into.

Hat tip: Pos-Darwinista

One Reply to “When organized crime got ID?

  1. 1
    johnnyb says:

    There always needs to be someone whose knowledge is in fact an intelligent commentary for a naturalist theory of mind to be valid, which means by definition that it isn’t.

    Not quite. It is enough for *my* mind to be intelligent – the rest of you can be merely reacting according to your genes 🙂

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