Evolution Intelligent Design

Researcher: “[i]t’s amazing how clear cut the change from ‘no dinosaurs’ to ‘all dinosaurs’ was.”

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Dinosaur fossil/ramirezom, Fotolia

From ScienceDaily:

Lead author Dr Massimo Bernardi, Curator at MUSE and Research associate at Bristol’s School of Earth Sciences, said: “We were excited to see that the footprints and skeletons told the same story. We had been studying the footprints in the Dolomites for some time, and it’s amazing how clear cut the change from ‘no dinosaurs’ to ‘all dinosaurs’ was.”

The point of explosion of dinosaurs matches the end of the Carnian Pluvial Episode, a time when climates shuttled from dry to humid and back to dry again.

It was long suspected that this event had caused upheavals among life on land and in the sea, but the details were not clear. Then, in 2015, dating of rock sections and measurement of oxygen and carbon values showed just what had happened.

There were massive eruptions in western Canada, represented today by the great Wrangellia basalts — these drove bursts of global warming, acid rain, and killing on land and in the oceans.

“The extinction didn’t just clear the way for the age of the dinosaurs, but also for the origins of many modern groups, including lizards, crocodiles, turtles, and mammals — key land animals today.” Paper. (open access) – Massimo Bernardi, Piero Gianolla, Fabio Massimo Petti, Paolo Mietto, Michael J. Benton. Dinosaur diversification linked with the Carnian Pluvial Episode. Nature Communications, 2018; 9 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-03996-1 More.

A friend notes, The paper in Nature Communications refers to an “explosion” of dinosaur diversity, noting “dinosaurs diversified explosively” in the Carnian Pluvial Episode (CPE) in the mid-Triassic (234-232). They term it the “dinosaur diversification event” (DDE).

Funny how these bangs of organization rather than destruction seem to appear so often from nowhere.

See also: But should we be talking about a “Big Bang” of birds?

Not a Big Bang of turtles TOO?

4 Replies to “Researcher: “[i]t’s amazing how clear cut the change from ‘no dinosaurs’ to ‘all dinosaurs’ was.”

  1. 1
    polistra says:

    Given the mechanism of fossilization, there’s no reason to assume that any new species arose or extinguished.

    Only an EXTREMELY small fraction of a population ends up in a fossil situation, and a small fraction of those are preserved over millions of years. Each fossil is a “poll” representing a billion or 10 billion individuals. If the population is under a billion, we probably won’t ever find one. So a sudden appearance or disappearance of fossils tells us when a population got huge or got less than huge. It can’t possibly document origin or extinction.

  2. 2
    PaV says:

    polistra:

    Really? “A sudden appearance or disappearance of fossils tells us when a population got huge or got less than huge. It can’t possibly document origin or extinction.”

    Is your argument that dinosaurs existed for hundreds of millions of years before dinosaur fossils began to appear in the fossil record, but they existed as only ‘small’ populations—that is, not “billions of dinosaurs,” only hundreds of thousands of them, and since they were so ‘small’ they just didn’t hit the ‘fossil jackpot’ and show up in the fossil record?

    Have I understood you correctly?

  3. 3
    PaV says:

    News:

    If you look up the 2010 paper that is the basis for the origination of dinosaurs 245 mya, you’ll find that they have NO DIRECT evidence, i.e., fossils, for this date, but is simply an inference they make because a ‘sister group’ to dinosaurs existed in the mid-Triassic.

    IOW, when you look at dinosaur fossils, you see NOTHING until the CPE (Carnian Pluvial Episode). It was an “explosion,” plain and simple.

  4. 4
    harry says:

    The fossil record looks like life arose on Earth in a series of creative acts. Hmmmm … It seems to me I read an account of life arising on this planet in just that way.

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