Exoplanets News

Eight new Goldilocks planets announced

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From Phys.org:

Astronomers announced today that they have found eight new planets in the “Goldilocks” zone of their stars, orbiting at a distance where liquid water can exist on the planet’s surface. This doubles the number of small planets (less than twice the diameter of Earth) believed to be in the habitable zone of their parent stars. Among these eight, the team identified two that are the most similar to Earth of any known exoplanets to date. More.

“We don’t know for sure whether any of the planets in our sample are truly habitable,” explains second author David Kipping of the CfA. “All we can say is that they’re promising candidates.”

File:A small cup of coffee.JPG Don’t sell your condo just yet.

Also: Is “exoplanets” a short form for “Hope springs eternal”?

See also: Don’t let Mars fool you. Those exoplanets teem with life!

(Goldilocks planets info)

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3 Replies to “Eight new Goldilocks planets announced

  1. 1
    rvb8 says:

    I’m fascinated by the tone of this post, and the tone of almost all your posts. It seems you are almost joyful at the failure, as yet, to discover new things.Is this standard in ID thought? You appear pleased that these scientists have not found a comparable world to earth. (Be assured, in this universe there is other life, that is plain to surmise, size alone argues against the ney sayers.) But your posts are just astoundingly dense in their desire, ‘not to know!’ Your medieval view of our existence is, I am sure, comforting to your tiny view of life, however, as far as understanding the universe, and our miniscule place in it goes, it is not at all helpful.

    Discovery is good Denyse, along with curiosity, it makes us somewhat more than, well, whatever it is that you believe we are.

  2. 2
    Sebestyen says:

    Your medieval view of our existence is, I am sure, comforting to your tiny view of life, however, as far as understanding the universe, and our miniscule place in it goes, it is not at all helpful.

    Then why don’t you tell us how this discovery is supposed to be helpful?

    From the article:

    As with many Kepler discoveries, the newly found planets are distant enough to make additional observations challenging. Kepler-438b is located 470 light-years from Earth while the more distant Kepler-442b is 1,100 light-years away.

    IOW, there’s not much else they can do except maybe giving the coordinates to the SETI guys.
    Once they’ve invented FTL travel they can spend money for looking for planets in other solar systems but until then the money is better spent elsewhere imo.

    (Be assured, in this universe there is other life, that is plain to surmise, size alone argues against the ney sayers.)

    Arguing with “size” is ridiculous. Unless someone comes up with conclusive proof that life can come into existence by purely phyiscal/chemical processes under the conditions of the early earth you don’t even have a proper basis for calculating how rare or common life is in the universe.
    It is not unrealistic even under evolutionary premises to assume life is so rare that our planet is the only one in the whole galaxy that bears life.

    Sebestyen

  3. 3
    Joe says:

    If scientists really want to find an earth-like planet then they need to heed the advice in “The Privileged Planet”. The first criteria is finding a star that is like our Sun. Red dwarves are not good candidates for earth-like planets as their output is wrong and any planet in the habitable zone would be locked in- ie rotation = revolution, like our Moon.

    Also if this universe was Intelligently Designed we should expect to find other intelligent agencies inhabiting other planets in other solar systems. “The Privileged Planet” goes over that also.

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