Genetics Genomics Plants

A complex network of genes helps plants cope with DNA damage

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File:DNA simple.svg From ScienceDaily:

When a building is damaged, a general contractor often oversees various subcontractors — framers, electricians, plumbers and drywall hangers — to ensure repairs are done in the correct order and on time.

Similarly, when DNA is damaged, a molecular general contractor oversees a network of genetic subcontractors to ensure that the diverse cellular tasks needed to protect and repair the genome are carried out correctly and on time.

Image result for plant vector graphic public domain

Scientists have known for some time that a master gene named SOG1 acts like a general contractor for repair, coordinating with various genetic subcontractors of the plant cell to mount an effective DNA damage response. But, it wasn’t clear which specific genes were among the subcontractors, nor how SOG1 interacted with them to oversee the DNA damage response.

Now, researchers at the Salk Institute report which genes are turned on or off, and in which order, to orchestrate the cellular processes required to protect and repair the genome in response to DNA damage. The research, which appeared in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences during the week of October 10, 2018, reveals the genetic framework controlling a complex biological process that has broad implications for understanding how plants in particular, and organisms in general, cope with DNA damage to ensure long-term health and fitness.

“Just as a building with structural damage can be unsafe, cells with DNA damage that goes unnoticed or unrepaired can be dangerous,” says Assistant Professor Julie Law, the senior author of the paper. “However, the timing and overall coordination of events occurring after the detection of damaged DNA remain poorly understood. Is SOG1 acting like a micromanager, directly pointing each subcontractor to a task, or does it have a more hands-off role? This paper brings us one step closer to understanding how the response to DNA damage is coordinated over time to maintain genome stability.” Paper. (open access) – Clara Bourbousse, Neeraja Vegesna, Julie A. Law. SOG1 activator and MYB3R repressors regulate a complex DNA damage network in Arabidopsis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2018; 201810582 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1810582115 More.

And, we are told, it all just happens, even though nature shows no evidence of design and evolution is random, not governed by laws … Note that they don’t even try to describe it without resorting to little human figures.

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See also: Researchers: Cross-species gene regulation observed for the first time

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4 Replies to “A complex network of genes helps plants cope with DNA damage

  1. 1
    PeterA says:

    This is very interesting.

    When did this kind of system appear? How?

  2. 2
    jawa says:

    When a building is damaged, a general contractor often oversees various subcontractors — framers, electricians, plumbers and drywall hangers — to ensure repairs are done in the correct order and on time.

    Similarly, when DNA is damaged, a molecular general contractor oversees a network of genetic subcontractors to ensure that the diverse cellular tasks needed to protect and repair the genome are carried out correctly and on time.

    How did they dare to use analogies between human and plant molecular/cellular activities? Haven’t they been told that that kind of language could damage the neo-Darwinian “theory” and benefit the ID cause? 🙂

  3. 3
    jawa says:

    PeterA:

    “When did this kind of system appear? How?”

    It somehow appeared a while ago as the product of RV+NS. There was plenty of time for it to happen. Don’t believe gpuccio’s version of the story. He usually writes overloaded terms like “complex functional specified information” and dumps a bunch of weird BLAST stats to overwhelm the readers. 🙂

    Did that answer your questions? Let’s hope so.
    If it didn’t, then take a Biology 101 course to learn the stuff better. 🙂

  4. 4
    PeterA says:

    jawa,

    That wasn’t funny at all.
    My questions were serious.
    Better stay out of the discussion if you don’t know the topic well enough or don’t have anything relevant to contribute.

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