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Human and monkey brains more similar than thought …

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… which only makes the gap harder to account for. (“See All together now, one, two, three—what separates us from other animals?”)

From ScienceDaily:

The research concerns the ventrolateral frontal cortex, a region of the brain known for more than 150 years to be important for cognitive processes including language, cognitive flexibility, and decision-making. “It has been argued that to develop these abilities, humans had to evolve a completely new neural apparatus; however others have suggested precursors to these specialized brain systems might have existed in other primates,” explains lead author Dr. Franz-Xaver Neubert of the University of Oxford, in the UK.

By using non-invasive MRI techniques in 25 people and 25 macaques, Dr. Neubert and his team compared ventrolateral frontal cortex connectivity and architecture in humans and monkeys. The investigators were surprised to find many similarities in the connectivity of these regions. This suggests that some uniquely human cognitive traits may rely on an evolutionarily conserved neural apparatus that initially supported different functions. Additional research may reveal how slight changes in connectivity accompanied or facilitated the development of distinctly human abilities.

The researchers also noted some key differences between monkeys and humans. For example, ventrolateral frontal cortex circuits in the two species differ in the way that they interact with brain areas involved with hearing.

Actually, neural circuits tend to grow and decrease with use, so most likely the difference between using one’s ventrolateral frontal cortex for practising a speech vs. screeching makes at least some difference in organization.

Comments
This creationists welcomes the likeness of chimp brains with ours. This because we are really souls and think like our maker. The brain is irrelevant to our intelligence save in the memory. In fact I would say these connections said to be the same in chimps and us are in fact just about memory connections. not brain thinking as such. We should welcome all likeness with our brain withy chimps in order to show we don't think with our brain. Our brain is just a big memory machine in contact with our body i think. Just like a computer is about memory but its used by a person separate from it.Robert Byers
January 28, 2014
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This creationists welcomes the likeness of chimp brains with ours. This because we are really souls and think like our maker. The brain is irrelevant to our intelligence save in the memory. In fact I would say these connections said to be the same in chimps and us are in fact just about memory connections. not brain thinking as such. We should welcome all likeness with our brain withy chimps in order to show we don't think with our brain. Our brain is just a big memory machine in contact with our body i think. Just like a computer is about memory but its used by a person separate from it.Robert Byers
January 28, 2014
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2014
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podcast - "Human Brain Development as a Symphony" ,,a recent study from scientists at Yale that found that "human brain development is a symphony in three movements." The human brain develops through distinct patterns in gene activity,,, http://intelligentdesign.podomatic.com/entry/2014-01-08T16_36_24-08_00 Human brain development is a symphony in three movements - Dec. 2013 Excerpt: The human brain develops with an exquisitely timed choreography marked by distinct patterns of gene activity at different stages from the womb to adulthood, Yale researchers report in the Dec. 26 issue of the journal Neuron.,,, Intriguingly, say the researchers, some of the same patterns of genetic activity that define this human “hour glass” sketch were not observed in developing monkeys, indicating that they may play a role in shaping the features specific to human brain development. http://news.yale.edu/2013/12/26/human-brain-development-symphony-three-movementsbornagain77
January 28, 2014
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