Uncommon Descent Serving The Intelligent Design Community

If a coyote ate his grandma, would it matter?

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But if a human being did?

My latest story on what is going wrong with studies of human evolution:

It is the question no one answers because it has been set up as the question no one has to answer, even though it is the key question. Start by insisting that absolutely everything is a big accident, and we never have to ask why it only happened to us. More.

Human evolution series at your fingertips (human evolution)

Comments
"There is nothing inherently bad about cannibalism any more than there is anything inherently bad about homosexuality." And then the Nihilist came and asked, 'Then what makes anything inherently bad?' and received no satisfying answers in light of eschatology and what naturalism supposes. VunderGuy
In many "primitive" societies it was/is common to eat every member of the tribe who dies. It maintains the spirits of the group. Cannibalism is a social custom, just like most other human actions. If your tribe has rejected cannibalism, then you are taught that cannibalism is revolting. There is nothing inherently bad about cannibalism any more than there is anything inherently bad about homosexuality. The Greeks and Romans (and most likely many other Mediterranean cultures) believed that since women were deformed males who lacked brains and "will" (animus), a man could only form a could only form a true relationship with another man. (Homosexuality among women was considered a topic not worth discussing.) mahuna
I hate to flog a deceased equine, but it seems to me that reductionism is what makes this possible. I recognize that the materialist has NO other alternative, but still. OldArmy94

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