Design inference Human evolution Intelligent Design

A design inference with respect to Neanderthal art

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At one time, it was an article of faith that Neanderthals could not do art. Much has changed:

A longstanding question among both evolutionists and Darwin-skeptics is whether Neanderthals were capable of symbolic artistic expression. This debate has gone back and forth for years and a new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences adds to the conversation by making a detailed analysis leading to a design inference that supports painting by Neanderthals. The study looked at the Cueva (Cave) de Ardales in Málaga, Spain which contains flowstones that have been stained by iron. A nice example of what these iron-stained flowstones look like can be seen here. The question is whether the iron-staining is the result of natural processes (e.g., flowing water depositing iron oxide) or deliberate painting using some kind of an ochre-based pigment. The study ultimately makes a design inference — the iron-staining is the result of real Neanderthal painting — as Science Daily reports …

In the technical paper they explain that the pattern of staining they observed is inconsistent with “natural geological processes.”

Casey Luskin, “Painting by Neanderthals? Study Makes a Design Inference” at Evolution News and Science Today (August 11, 2021)

Recall the 2012 bombshell when Neanderthal art was found, obliterating many certified lesser human theories.

Just let the paleontologists keep on making design inferences… Don’t spoil the fun.

The paper is closed access.

4 Replies to “A design inference with respect to Neanderthal art

  1. 1
    ET says:

    “But biological reproduction is natural. That means nature created Neanderthals. So there”, says every evolutionist, ever. 🙂

  2. 2
    polistra says:

    In a previous comment I got carried away with the significance of red ochre.

    This could be a simpler situation. “Color fountains” are fascinating for humans of all eras, and humans often develop cultural traditions centered on those fountains.

    This fountain reminds me of the Dropping Well of Harrogate.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=DTUZAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA466

  3. 3
    Silver Asiatic says:

    polistra

    This could be a simpler situation. “Color fountains” are fascinating for humans of all eras, and humans often develop cultural traditions centered on those fountains.

    Exactly. Some of the earliest cave art is as good or better than contemporary art today.
    (I see a canvas of Cave Painting Of Bison At Altamira on sale for $160)
    As soon as humans appear, they did some beautiful art and experimented with color and shape.
    It’s the human soul responding to the beauty of nature, and having the built-in ability to create art.
    There’s no evolution there to speak of.

  4. 4
    mahuna says:

    I agree with Silver Asiatic. And once a group of humans began to get their copying techniques down to a system, Thogetta says to Thog, says she, “Thog, baby, can you do another flower for me? But this time show the leaves on the stem.” The Art is in the DEVIATION. God does just fine with the originals.

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