Intelligent Design Mind Naturalism Neuroscience

A review of remarkable cases of people’s minds functioning despite brain damage

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Abstract: Neuroscientists typically assume that human mental functions are generated by the brain and that its structural elements, including the different cell layers and tissues that form the neocortex, play specific roles in this complex process. Different functional units are thought to complement one another to create an integrated self-awareness or episodic memory. Still, findings that pertain to brain dysplasia and brain lesions indicate that in some individuals there is a considerable discrepancy between the cerebral structures and cognitive functioning. This seems to question the seemingly well-defined role of these brain structures.
This article provides a review of such remarkable cases. It contains overviews of noteworthy aspects of hydrocephalus, hemihydranencephaly, hemispherectomy, and certain abilities of “savants.” We add considerations on memory processing, comment on the assumed role of neural plasticity in these contexts, and highlight the importance of taking such anomalies into account when formulating encompassing models of brain functioningMore. –(public access) – Michael Nahm, David Rousseau and Bruce Greyson, “Discrepancy Between Cerebral Structure and Cognitive Functioning: A Review,” The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease Volume 205 Number 12 (2017) pp. 967-972

Ironically, modern neuroimaging techniques often support non-naturalism. Big bucks support naturalism.

See also: Neuroscience tried wholly embracing naturalism, but then the brain got away

and

Nature, as defined today, cannot be all there is. Science demonstrates that.

2 Replies to “A review of remarkable cases of people’s minds functioning despite brain damage

  1. 1

    Love this post. Thank you.

  2. 2
    Axel says:

    https://uncommondescent.com/intelligent-design/a-review-of-remarkable-cases-of-peoples-minds-functioning-despite-brain-damage/#comment-646538

    The second article by Pim van Lommel, at the link, below, under the title, Medical Evidence for Near Death Experiences: A Reply to Shermer, is very interesting on this subject.

    The author suggests, on the basis of the evidence so far available, the possibility that the brain acts as a kind of TV receiver, picking up information from an ambient, electromagnetic, informational field, which remains nearby, for a brief period after death.

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