Intelligent Design

Alternatives to Methodological Naturalism Online Conference Preview Completed

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UPDATE – updated title to reflect that the conference has already occurred now.

Find the time in your time zone.

The Alternatives to Methodological Naturalism Online Conference is holding a free preview session this evening at 7:30 PM Central Time.  There are three ways to join, including just calling in with your phone, so don’t miss out!  Be sure to connect 5-10 minutes beforehand to make sure you don’t have any issues.  Once the session starts it will be difficult to solve any issues.  We will open the conferencing system a half an hour before the conference starts (7PM Central Time).

Connection Method 1: Download the Join.me App

This is the best way to connect.  First, download the join.me application and install it on your computer.  When you run the application, it will ask you to create a free account.  Once you have an account and are logged in, you can join the meeting.  The meeting code is: blythinstitute

Once you join, you need to click the phone icon on the application and choose whether you will receive audio over the Internet, or if you want to call in with your phone.  You will not receive any sound unless you choose to receive the audio over the Internet!

Connection Method 2: Use Your Browser

While the join.me app gives the best experience, you can also just join directly through your browser, and this does not require you to create an account.  All you have to do is click on the following URL when you want to log in:

http://join.me/blythinstitute

Once you are connected, you need to click the phone icon on the application and choose whether you will receive audio over the Internet, or if you want to call in with your phone.  You will not receive any sound unless you choose to receive the audio over the Internet!

Connection Method 3: Phone Call

While the session has a slide presentation, if you are not at your computer, or don’t want to have the hassle of dealing with your computer, you can simply call in to the meeting and just listen in.  To get a complete list of phone numbers available to call in (many local numbers for many different countries are available), you can click this link and enter in blythinstitute for the meeting number.  One number you can dial for the U.S. is +1.734.746.0035.  Once you are in, the conference number to use is 998-994-701 (this is NOT a phone number – it is the conference number that you enter after you dial the phone number).

Getting Help

If you need help, you can get help by clicking on the link below:

https://tlk.io/amnat-preview

This is a simple text chat, and you can quickly and easily ask and get answers.  The chat room is open now if you have any questions.

16 Replies to “Alternatives to Methodological Naturalism Online Conference Preview Completed

  1. 1
    Mung says:

    Correct browser link is:

    http://join.me/blythinstitute

    join.me not join.my. 😉

  2. 2
    Mung says:

    Topic is ‘Universals of Language’ by Noel Rude

  3. 3
    Dionisio says:

    johnnyb
    Thank you for the information about this online conference.
    BTW, Central Time is GMT-5
    Since I’m currently @GMT+2 -i.e. 7hrs ahead of CDT- apparently this online conference was @2am here in this part of Europe.

    Here’s an “off topic” news “breakthrough” for you and your readers to enjoy:

    Next time someone asks you about the identity of the alleged ‘designer’, here’s the answer (finally!):

    The following link points to a video where around time mark 20:45 this “Systems Biology” professor reveals the identity of the designer?

    Cool, isn’t it? Now we know it!
    We should have figured out that long ago, though.
    It was obvious, wasn’t it?
    All the evidences pointed to it.

    🙂

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/xo-7m0YnN8o

    PS. Anyone looking for an introduction to Systems Biology may seriously consider watching the entire 15-lecture video course. Professor Uri Alon teaches it very smoothly with deep breaths of relief every once in a while.

  4. 4
    REW says:

    Dionisio

    Was it you who posted a link to Alon’s lectures a few weeks ago? I bookmarked it but havent had time to watch more than a part of the first lecture.

    You take issue with Alon’s claim that evolution could produce those functional networks but from the lecture you posted its clear that starting from ( the unlikely case of) a random network, natural selection could transform it into a finely tuned negative autoregulation function.

  5. 5
    Mung says:

    Uri Alon is the author of one of my favorite design books.

    An Introduction to Systems Biology: Design Principles of Biological Circuits

  6. 6
    johnnyb says:

    Mung – thanks for the correction – how embarrassing! Thank you to everyone who attended! I will have the recording up soon.

  7. 7
    Dionisio says:

    REW @4

    […] its clear that starting from ( the unlikely case of) a random network, natural selection could transform it into a finely tuned negative autoregulation function.

    Really? How? Can you indicate the time mark in the given 15-lecture course, or in another free online course, or the page(s) number(s) in a recent textbook, or in a peer-reviewed paper, where that process is explained in a comprehensive, coherent way that holds water?

    BTW, my main point was about the use of the controversial term ‘design’ the way professor Alon did.
    The act of designing a complex functional information-processing system can only originate from a conscious intelligent agent, as far as we know from experience and logical thinking.
    A machine may produce it, but the designing requires an intelligent mind.
    Think about this.
    🙂

  8. 8
    REW says:

    BTW, my main point was about the use of the controversial term ‘design’ the way professor Alon did.
    The act of designing a complex functional information-processing system can only originate from a conscious intelligent agent, as far as we know from experience and logical thinking.
    A machine may produce it, but the designing requires an intelligent mind.

    Dr Alon appreciates the ‘design’ of living things as well as anyone and yet he accepts evolution. You realize this, right?

    Really? How? Can you indicate the time mark in the given 15-lecture course, or in another free online course, or the page(s) number(s) in a recent textbook, or in a peer-reviewed paper, where that process is explained in a comprehensive, coherent way that holds water?

    No, I dont have the time to look it up. If I watch Alons lectures I’ll post the time mark and lecture. I assume he’ll bring it up- its pretty obvious. Random changes to TF binding sites and promoters could produce the forms of regulation he discusses and tune them appropriately since- as me mentions- theres a definite advantage to them

  9. 9
    Dionisio says:

    REW @8

    Dr Alon appreciates the ‘design’ of living things as well as anyone and yet he accepts evolution. You realize this, right?

    FYI “evolution designed it” is a catch-all phrase. Professors may use it in lieu of “we don’t know”, which is a very scientific statement, denoting humility, but rarely heard these days.
    BTW, professor Alon did indicate that much is unknown in biology. However, the important thing to consider is that what is known definitely points to intelligent design.
    The more we know, more is for us to learn, but the big picture looks more like intelligently designed.
    I dislike the unknowns. That’s why I look forward, with increasing anticipation, to reading new research papers tat shed more light on the elaborate molecular and cellular choreographies orchestrated within the biological systems.
    These are fascinating times to watch what’s going on in scientific research, particularly in biology.
    New discoveries may answer some outstanding questions while raising new ones.
    Scientists should be open-minded to think out of any pre-established box and should go where the evidences lead them.

  10. 10
    Dionisio says:

    REW @8

    I dont have the time to look it up. If I watch Alons lectures I’ll post the time mark and lecture. I assume he’ll bring it up- its pretty obvious. Random changes to TF binding sites and promoters could produce the forms of regulation he discusses and tune them appropriately since- as me mentions- theres a definite advantage to them

    Whenever you find that information, you’re most welcome to post it here.
    However, please keep in mind that I don’t have time to squander it on senseless arguments that lead nowhere.
    I prefer to use some of the spare time available to watch technical online courses like professor Alon’s or the ones offered free by MIT and other universities. BTW, MIT offers an online course on Systems Biology also recorded in 2014.
    If you find something specific to present here that supports the above quoted comment that you posted @8, I’ll be glad to look at it, assuming I come to this site and see your post -sometimes I stay away longer. The project I’m currently working on is time consuming and very demanding.
    Thank you.

  11. 11
    Dionisio says:

    Mung @5
    What’s the most recent edition of his textbook? Is there a newer version after 2006?
    There are much newer books on Systems Biology by other authors available on Amazon.
    This interesting field seems growing fast.
    Technology is helping the wet lab researchers to produce more data which gets stored in the clouds for the dry lab researchers to process it.

  12. 12
    Dionisio says:

    REW

    here’s a 2014 online course on Systems Biology offered by MIT -same year as the Weizmann Institute course taught by Professor Alon but with a different approach and without the relaxing (learning-conducive) deep breaths of relief:

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/gc3O2sKIsX4?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63OI3pSKo8Ha_DFBMxm23xO

  13. 13
    Dionisio says:

    REW

    You may want to take both 2014 Systems Biology courses -Weizmann and MIT- and compare them for better understanding and learning.
    Enjoy them!

  14. 14
    REW says:

    Dionisio

    Thanks, I’ll check both of them out ..and watch as many as I have time for!

    Doesn’t he do the breathing when someone walks in late? ..as a gentle way of shaming them?

  15. 15
    Dionisio says:

    REW @14

    Doesn’t he do the breathing when someone walks in late? ..as a gentle way of shaming them?

    Yes, but not only then.

    Did you note within the first two minutes of the initial (introductory) lecture (basic concepts) he draws a simple diagram that shows the relation between reaching or being in a relaxed state and breathing deep?

    Did you note in some lectures he has a few ‘breaths’ scheduled a priori (written on the board) – inserted within the itemized class contents, at certain important points of his teaching plan for that given class?

  16. 16
    GaryGaulin says:

    I wanted to say that the preview was useful for my knowing what I needed to help explain with my model. There are words that we intuitively understand like “thinking” and “left” or “right” symmetry where there is a cognitive and/or biological basis for the word that relates how our brain and body works. One of the questions asked about that sort of thing, where the model I have should be useful. In one example insects and also we have a left/right hemisphere bilateral brain symmetry in how we think. This system:

    Central Control of Insect Locomotion
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlC7F64c30Q

    The concept of left/right is already there, to be a given a name to. But like an insect it does not need to have names for each side to have a sense of left/right in the way it thinks.

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