Intelligent Design Religion Science

American Scientific Affiliation Annual Meeting at Baylor This Summer

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This just in from Walter Bradley, President of the ASA:

Dear Friends,

I wanted to bring to your attention a unique opportunity this summer. The annual meeting of the American Scientific Affiliation will be held at Baylor University July 31-August 3. The ASA is the world’s largest organization of evangelical Christians who work in science and engineering, and it provides a forum to discuss faith-science questions.

The program this year is particularly exciting with a mini-symposium on string theory and the alleged multi-universe and another symposium on origins where theistic evolution and intelligent design will be discussed. Timely issues raised by the human genome and its interpretation by some to imply a non-historical Adam and Eve will be discussed by three outstanding theologians, including Jack Collins from Covenant Theological Seminary (with 2 degrees from MIT in electrical engineering). Astronaut Charlie Duke will be keynoting the conference, describing his experiences as the first and only person to drive on the moon…..and his journey to faith subsequently. Exciting sessions on sociology and psychology and Christian faith, history of science and faith, and human conscientiousness are also included along with two sessions on appropriate technology as a means of ministering to the poor.

Stephen Meyer, Bill Dembski, Bruce Gordon, Doug Axe, Robert Marks, David Snoke and Richard Sternberg will all be presenting in the Origins mini-symposium. The complete program can be found at www.asa3.org by clicking the link for the program for the 2009 annual meeting.

The deadline for early registration discounts is June 30th, so please check it out quickly the program and register by next Tuesday to get the early registration discount.

See you at the conference,

Walter

Walter L. Bradley, Ph.D., P.E.
Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Baylor University
Waco, TX 76798

6 Replies to “American Scientific Affiliation Annual Meeting at Baylor This Summer

  1. 1
    fbeckwith says:

    “Stephen Meyer, Bill Dembski, Bruce Gordon, Doug Axe, Robert Marks, David Snoke and Richard Sternberg will all be presenting in the Origins mini-symposium.”

    Looks interesting. I plan on attending.

    I had forgotten about this. Thanks for posting it.

  2. 2
    sparc says:

    Astronaut Charlie Duke will be keynoting the conference, describing his experiences as the first and only person to drive on the moon

    Actually LRVs have been used during Apollo missions 15 -17. Thus it Dave Scott and James Irwin drove on the moon earlier than Apollo 16 LM pilot Charlie Duke.

  3. 3
    O'Leary says:

    To my horror, I have just remembered I must write an article for these people’s journal!

    Apparently, my lead author, Mario Beauregard, is supposed to speak at their conference, unless he has already done that and come home.

    Anyway, I really will get that article done in July.

  4. 4
    Echidna-Levy says:

    its interpretation by some to imply a non-historical Adam and Eve

    Given that cheetahs suffered a population crash about 10000 years ago and the evidence for that is in their genome (they lost 90% of their genetic variation at that time) if there was really a couple “Adam and Eve” then would not the bottleneck be even more obvious in the human genome then it is in the cheetahs?

    And where are “Adam and Eve” supposed to have existed? Are we talking YEC timescales? 10,000 to 6000 years?

    Or are we talking millions of years?

    Given that you, Dr Dembski have said

    a very live possibility that common descent is the case

    It seems to me you cannot claim that Adam and Eve were real and at the same time claim that common descent is even a possiblity. They seem to me to be mutually exclusive, for obvious reasons.

  5. 5
    CannuckianYankee says:

    Levy,

    I’m sure if you used your imagination you could come up with a scenario that would allow for both common descent and the true existence of Adam and Eve, without defying logic.

  6. 6
    Scot.David says:

    This likes a real nice time, and just I hope and pray the New Baylor Cafeteria is up for the challenge. I was able to find this through the Google, so it looks like all us ID supporters will be able to take advantage of the after seminar conversations:

    For late night snack, check out Memorial

    Cafeteria food will probably never replace Mom’s Sunday dinner, but Aramark went a long way toward making students feel at home by keeping the refrigerator open for late night raids.

    Beginning this semester, Memorial Cafeteria is open from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday. The menu includes favorites such as pizza, chicken strips, hamburgers, chicken-fried steak and salads ä just the kind of comfort food craved during late-night cramming.

    This should ease the budget strains of midnight What-a-runs across the interstate to the fast food joints.

    Though the variety is somewhat greater, the taste of the food hasn’t changed significantly. Things don’t seem any worse or better than they’ve recently been, but that wasn’t too bad to begin with.

    Meanwhile, the made-to-order stir fry and omelet are appreciated additions and without any noticeable effect on the amount of time it takes to get through the line, even during peak dining hours.

    The choice of RFOC (Real Food On Campus, the name of the new cafeteria program being tried out at Memorial) as a label does beg one question, however ä what are the other cafeterias serving?

    When combined with the hours and the food, the new d+cor is the finishing touch that puts Aramark within reach of the ‘dining experience’ its employees say they’re trying to achieve. The cafeteria’s atmosphere is lighter and airier, and the pictures adorning the wall simulate a mall food court.

    In short, Memorial’s changes haven’t cost the cafeteria any of its good qualities and have made the possession of a meal plan a bit more desirable for students. Hopefully RFOC will quickly spread to other campus cafeterias.

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