Cell biology Intelligent Design

At New Scientist: A shortage of trace metals might have accounted for the development of complex cells

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The myths of pop science often read just that way, like myths:

Trace metals like iron and copper became rare in the oceans between 2 and 1.2 billion years ago, after having been abundant for the previous billion years. This decrease may have caused a crisis for the simple microorganisms of the time, ultimately leading to the evolution of complex cells.

Michael Marshall, “Complex cells may have evolved due to a shortage of trace metals ” at New Scientist

The article is paywalled but in a sense that doesn’t really matter. You could make up your own version.

The basic idea is that complex information events can derive from simple shortages of something or other. It’s the same school of thought that explains human consciousness as having evolved in order to enable our ancestors to co-operate while hunting. As if greater intelligence is needed for that than can be found in a wolf pack. No wonder these fields tend to be marked by a lack of progress.

2 Replies to “At New Scientist: A shortage of trace metals might have accounted for the development of complex cells

  1. 1
    jawa says:

    Really? Yeah, right. 🙂

  2. 2
    Fasteddious says:

    ” in a sense that doesn’t really matter. You could make up your own version.” Too funny! Yet so true!
    Amazing the powers things like climate, oxygen, trace metals, and other environmental conditions have to create new life! And people get paid to write these just-so stories?

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