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Genes linked to murder: Great news for Magna Carta

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These genes are supposedly linked to murder:

The Finnish scientists gleaned the results from a group of 753 inmates incarcerated in Finland’s 19 largest prisons. The group comprised 215 non-violent offenders, in jail for offenses like drunk-driving or drug distribution, and 538 violent offenders, who committed at least one act of murder, attempted murder, manslaughter, attempted manslaughter, or battery. Violent offenders who committed more than ten crimes were further classified into an “extremely violent” subgroup. 84 of them fit the bill.

Genetic testing showed that members of this extremely violent subgroup were much more likely than non-violent criminals to have the low-activity MAOA gene and the CDH13 variant.

Despite the strong results, the researchers make clear that the genetics of criminal behavior is a young science. It’s far too early to even consider screening individuals for potential violent inclinations, nor should somebody’s genotype be considered in the courtroom.

Yeah sure. So then why did you publish it?

Actually, it would take a long time to rule out epigenetic and environment factors in real life.

By the way, haven’t we been here before? Didn’t we agree a while back that we would never eat lunch in this dump again?

Magna Carta

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2 Replies to “Genes linked to murder: Great news for Magna Carta

  1. 1
    JoeCoder says:

    I’m accept the idea that genes can influence behavior. But there was an interesting rebuttal to this study on reddit. Worth reading.

  2. 2
    wd400 says:

    Actually, it would take a long time to rule out epigenetic and environment factors in real life.

    H’uh? Absent population structure, how would a genotype’s correlation with a phenotype be the result of environmental factors? It’s hard to know what you mean by epigenetics, but using normal definitions it seems to be irrelevant here.

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