Astronomy Intelligent Design

Here’s something we don’t see every day: A blazar in the early universe

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IMAGE
LBA IMAGE OF THE BLAZAR PSO J0309+27 AT A DISTANCE OF 12.8 BILLION LIGHT-YEARS FROM EARTH. GALAXY’S CORE IS AT BOTTOM RIGHT, AND JET IS PROPELLED OUTWARD FROM THE CORE… view more 
CREDIT: SPINGOLA ET AL.; BILL SAXTON, NRAO/AUI/NSF.

Recently spotted. A blazar is like a quasar but pointed at a different angle:

The supersharp radio “vision” of the National Science Foundation’s Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) has revealed previously unseen details in a jet of material ejected at three-quarters the speed of light from the core of a galaxy some 12.8 billion light-years from Earth. The galaxy, dubbed PSO J0309+27, is a blazar, with its jet pointed toward Earth, and is the brightest radio-emitting blazar yet seen at such a distance. It also is the second-brightest X-ray emitting blazar at such a distance.

In this image, the brightest radio emission comes from the galaxy’s core, at bottom right. The jet is propelled by the gravitational energy of a supermassive black hole at the core, and moves outward, toward the upper left. The jet seen here extends some 1,600 light-years, and shows structure within it.

At this distance, PSO J0309+27 is seen as it was when the universe was less than a billion years old, or just over 7 percent of its current age.

National Radio Astronomy Observatory, “A blazar in the early universe” at Eurekalert (December 22, 2020)

One Reply to “Here’s something we don’t see every day: A blazar in the early universe

  1. 1

    “powered by a black hole” is of course, pure speculation. In the words of one astrophysicist, “supernovae are oversubscribed”, and likewise in spades, black holes are oversubscribed. If they had to do everything people assign to them, they would waste away in an even shorter period of time than is observed.

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