Intelligent Design

Problems With the Canonical Giant-Impact Model of Moon Evolution

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The problem with evolutionary theories is not that they are impossible—any theory, no matter how bad it is, if held with sufficient conviction can be adorned with sufficient epicycles to explain the data and avoid outright impossibility. And evolutionists certainly do have the needed conviction. For evolutionists, their theory simply cannot be false. That option is not on the table and they will do whatever it takes to avoid it, including blackballing scientists, falsely claiming the theory to be a scientific fact, misrepresenting the science in courts and in textbooks, contriving false histories, and so forth. And so while evolutionary theories can never be outright falsified, they are improbable. This can be seen both (i) by comparing the theory with the evidence and (ii) by all those epicycles which evolutionists must use to patch up their theories. The many patches added to evolutionary theories result in high complexity and loss of parsimony. One example that Robin Canup recently discussed is the origin of the Earth-Moon system.  Read more

One Reply to “Problems With the Canonical Giant-Impact Model of Moon Evolution

  1. 1
    mahuna says:

    Um, the Earth-Moon system is another low probability fact about the planetary system of Sol. Why does Venus have no moons at all? Why does Mars have 2 tiny ones? I don’t think any single theory explains them all.

    One of the more interesting bits of the larger collider theory is that Earth swallowed the iron core of the impactor while at the same time shedding a good portion of our original crust. Venus, with its original thick crust, has no plate tectonics. Earth got double the iron core for an extra strong protective magnetic shield. And it got extra thin crust for moveable continents. It needed both.

    Earth is a very very improbable planet. But we know it exists. And we know that it exists with just the right attributes to support complex life for hundreds of millions of years. So I wouldn’t get too hung up in working out a final explanation. I don’t think we’ve gotten very far explaining bats either. I also don’t think the bats care.

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