Cell biology Genetics Intelligent Design

Protein tidies cells like sorting a kitchen drawer…

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The finding may help in the treatment of genetic disorders:

In a study with lab-grown mouse cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found that a protein that helps form a structural network under the surface of the cell’s “command center” — its nucleus — is key to ensuring that DNA inside it remains orderly…

“Each compartment created by a lamin acts like a kitchen utensil drawer, keeping knives, forks and spoons easy to access, and more rarely used items like serving pieces out of the way until needed,” Reddy says.

Johns Hopkins Medicine, “Mouse cell studies show that correcting DNA disorganization could aid diagnosis and treatment of rare inherited diseases” at ScienceDaily (November 14, 2021)

And the alternative?

The research team found that nuclear DNA in cells lacking lamin B looked nearly the same as normal cells dividing, implying that lamin B may not be essential to reorganizing DNA after cell division. However, nuclear DNA in cells lacking lamins A and C did not reorganize neatly, becoming tangled and unsorted from its normal compartments within the nucleus.

“It looked like there was a rowdy party in the normally well-organized kitchen,” says Reddy, of the cells lacking lamins A and C. “Things were not in their places and the strands of active and inactive DNA were intermingled and separated from the lamins at the edge of the nucleus.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine, “Mouse cell studies show that correcting DNA disorganization could aid diagnosis and treatment of rare inherited diseases” at ScienceDaily (November 14, 2021)

And the high information level needed for all that came into existence randomly, of course, just like kitchen drawers and utensils… Which makes sense if you buy the Darwinian approach to consciousness, which treats it as an illusion (whose?) So tidiers and tidying are random too…

The people who built up Darwinism decades ago probably didn’t expect to find this stuff.

The paper is open access.

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