Cambrian explosion Intelligent Design News

Remember that weird Cambrian, the Hallucogenia? Just a velvet worm?

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Hallucigenia sparsa/Elyssa Rider

From ScienceDaily:

The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered an important link with modern velvet worms, also known as onychophorans, a relatively small group of worm-like animals that live in tropical forests. The results are published in the advance online edition of the journal Nature.

“An exciting outcome of this study is that it turns our current understanding of the evolutionary tree of arthropods — the group including spiders, insects and crustaceans — upside down,” said Dr Javier Ortega-Hernandez, the paper’s co-author. “Most gene-based studies suggest that arthropods and velvet worms are closely related to each other; however, our results indicate that arthropods are actually closer to water bears, or tardigrades, a group of hardy microscopic animals best known for being able to survive the vacuum of space and sub-zero temperatures — leaving velvet worms as distant cousins.”

Hmmm. If this means arthropods are really closer to water bears than velvet worms, maybe think it out more?

Here’s the abstract:

The Palaeozoic form-taxon Lobopodia encompasses a diverse range of soft-bodied ‘legged worms’ known from exceptional fossil deposits1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. Although lobopodians occupy a deep phylogenetic position within Panarthropoda, a shortage of derived characters obscures their evolutionary relationships with extant phyla (Onychophora, Tardigrada and Euarthropoda)2, 3, 5, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15. Here we describe a complex feature in the terminal claws of the mid-Cambrian lobopodian Hallucigenia sparsa—their construction from a stack of constituent elements—and demonstrate that equivalent elements make up the jaws and claws of extant Onychophora. A cladistic analysis, informed by developmental data on panarthropod head segmentation, indicates that the stacked sclerite components in these two taxa are homologous—resolving hallucigeniid lobopodians as stem-group onychophorans. The results indicate a sister-group relationship between Tardigrada and Euarthropoda, adding palaeontological support to the neurological16, 17 and musculoskeletal18, 19 evidence uniting these disparate clades. These findings elucidate the evolutionary transformations that gave rise to the panarthropod phyla, and expound the lobopodian-like morphology of the ancestral panarthropod. – Martin R. Smith, Javier Ortega-Hernández. Hallucigenia’s onychophoran-like claws and the case for Tactopoda. Nature, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/nature13576(paywall)

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2 Replies to “Remember that weird Cambrian, the Hallucogenia? Just a velvet worm?

  1. 1
    cantor says:

    “An exciting outcome of this study is that it turns our current understanding of the evolutionary tree of arthropods — the group including spiders, insects and crustaceans — upside down…”

    The “evolutionary tree” has been “turned upside down” so many times I’ve lost track: is it present upside down or rightside up?

  2. 2
    Mung says:

    Arthropods from space!

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