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Scientific evidence that consciousness may not require a functioning brain

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A report by Adam Withnall in The Independent (7 October 2014) titled, Life after death? Largest-ever study provides evidence that ‘out of body’ and ‘near-death’ experiences may actually be real makes for fascinating reading. Writes Withnall:

There is scientific evidence to suggest that life can continue after death, according to the largest ever medical study carried out on the subject.

A team based in the UK has spent the last four years seeking out cardiac arrest patients to analyse their experiences, and found that almost 40 per cent of survivors described having some form of “awareness” at a time when they were declared clinically dead.

Experts currently believe that the brain shuts down within 20 to 30 seconds of the heart stopping beating – and that it is not possible to be aware of anything at all once that has happened.

But scientists in the new study heard said they heard compelling evidence that patients experienced real events for up to three minutes after this had happened ? and could recall them accurately once they had been resuscitated.

Dr Sam Parnia, an assistant professor at the State University of New York and a former research fellow at the University of Southampton who led the research, said that he previously that patients who described near-death experiences were only relating hallucinatory events.

One man, however, gave a “very credible” account of what was going on while doctors and nurses tried to bring him back to life – and says that he felt he was observing his resuscitation from the corner of the room.

Direct evidence of perception in the absence of a functioning brain

“So, how good is this evidence?” skeptics may ask. Pretty convincing, actually:

Speaking to The Telegraph about the evidence provided by a 57-year-old social worker [in] Southampton, Dr Parnia said: “We know the brain can’t function when the heart has stopped beating.

“But in this case, conscious awareness appears to have continued for up to three minutes.

“The man described everything that had happened in the room, but importantly, he heard two bleeps from a machine that makes a noise at three minute intervals. So we could time how long the experienced lasted for.

“He seemed very credible and everything that he said had happened to him had actually happened.”

Nor was this the only experience of its kind. Dr Parnia studied over 2,000 patients from 15 hospitals in the UK, US and Austria. His findings have been published in the journal Resuscitation.

Of those who survived, 46 per cent (nearly half) had mental recollections of some sort. Two per cent had explicit recall of “seeing” and “hearing” events while out of their bodies.

In fact, there is abundant evidence for the accuracy of reports by patients undergoing near-death experiences, according to an article by Dr. Bruce Greyson, titled, Cosmological Implications of Near-Death Experiences (Journal of Cosmology, 2011, Vol. 14, pp. 4684-4696).

In a recent review of 93 published reports of potentially verifiable out-of-body perceptions during NDEs, Holden (2009) found that 43% had been corroborated to the investigator by an independent informant, an additional 43% had been reported by the
experiencer to have been corroborated by an independent informant who was no longer available to be interviewed by the investigator, and only 14% relied solely on the experiencer’s report. Of these out-of-body perceptions, 92% were completely accurate, 6% contained some error, and only 1% was completely erroneous. Even among those
cases corroborated to the investigator by an independent informant, 88% were completely accurate, 10% contained some error, and 3% were completely erroneous. The cumulative weight of these cases is inconsistent with the conception that purported out-of-body perceptions are nothing more than hallucinations…

There is one particular kind of vision of the deceased that calls into question even more directly their dismissal as subjective hallucinations: cases in which the dying person apparently sees, and often expresses surprise at seeing, a person whom he or she thought was living, who had in fact recently died. Reports of such cases were published in the 19th century (Cobbe, 1882; Gurney and Myers, 1889; Johnson, 1899; Sidgwick, 1885) and have continued to be reported in recent years (Greyson, 2010b; Osis and Haraldsson, 1977; Sartori, 2008; van Lommel, 2004). In one recent case, a 9-year-old boy, upon awakening from a 36-hour coma, told his parents he had been with his deceased grandfather, aunt and uncle, and also with his 19-year-old sister, who was, as far as his family knew, alive and well at college, 500 miles away. Later that day, his parents received news from the college that their daughter had died in an automobile accident early that morning (Greyson, 2010b).

The case described above is described in Greyson, B. 2010. Seeing deceased persons not known to have died: “Peak in Darien” experiences. Anthropology and Humanism 35, 159-171.

A letter by Bruce Greyson, Janice Miner Holden and Pim van Lommel, titled, ‘There is nothing paranormal about near-death experiences’ revisited: comment on Mobbs and Watt (Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Volume 16, Issue 9, 445, 06 August 2012) rebuts the oft-cited skeptical myth that research by Mobbs and Watt, in a study conducted in 2011, has completely debunked the claim that NDEs are paranormal:

In a recent article in this journal entitled ‘There is nothing paranormal about near-death experiences’, Dean Mobbs and Caroline Watt [1] concluded that ‘[t]aken together, the scientific evidence suggests that all aspects of the near-death experience have a neurophysiological or psychological basis’ (p. 449). We suggest that Mobbs and Watt explained ‘all aspects’ of near-death experiences (NDEs) by ignoring aspects they could not explain and by overlooking a substantial body of empirical research on NDEs. In a subsequent radio interview, Watt acknowledged that they had avoided looking at any evidence for veridical out-of-body perception, resulting in their being unable to evaluate whether or not there was empirical evidence of anything paranormal about NDEs (http://bit.ly/MITeGP). But if Mobbs and Watt did not consider the evidence for possible paranormal features, then their claim that there is nothing paranormal about NDEs is not evidence-based…

In suggesting that there may be some evidence of paranormal features in NDEs, we are not suggesting that those features are supernatural or beyond scientific investigation. They may be paranormal in the sense of being difficult to explain in terms of the currently prevailing reductionistic framework. But we believe that they are entirely lawful and natural phenomena that can and should be studied by scientific methods, rather than dismissed without investigation.

I have long argued that a prior commitment to materialism is fatal to the enterprise of doing science properly. Materialism closes the mind, by convincing would-be researchers that the big questions have all been answered, and that we “know” where we came from. At last, a few courageous people are doing some research which is “out of the box” – and getting some unexpected answers. Who knows where it will lead?

What do readers think?

Comments
Mung looooooooool Lets hope the pseudo skeptics get what your sayingwallstreeter43
October 11, 2014
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If you have an iPad, you don't need a functioning brain.Mung
October 10, 2014
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Sorry , but I still hate my iPad mini keyboard lolwallstreeter43
October 10, 2014
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Dionisio, this is truly the million dollar question. It's like they really want their life to have no ultimate meaning, no ultimate purpose , no ultimate value and no ultimate hope. This is a question that most rational people will keep asking of them for many years to come. I still remember a leading Australian humanist organist organization (and thanks to my superb memory as usual, I can't recall the organizations name ) begging his fellow atheists worldwide to please redefine the meaning of nature and materialism to include a natural and materialistic Explanation for NDE's since they the evidence for consciousness surviving bodily death seemed strong and was only getting stronger . The problem for most of them is if they do that then what's to stop them from taking the next logical step to include the creator of these realms as well. Plus admitting Nde's are we since for the afterlife will force them to admit that they are indeed special in an eternal sense, and what rational , reasonable atheist of so either would want to admit that they are special lol I must say that BA's verse is the only thing that makes sense to me nowwallstreeter43
October 10, 2014
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"Yes, but why?" because,,, John 3:19 This is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil.bornagain77
October 10, 2014
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19 wallstreeter43
Materialists would rather sweep that one under the table than deal with the evidence
Yes, but why?Dionisio
October 10, 2014
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Bornagain, Pam Reynolds veridical NDE was one of the most medically monitored NDE's ever. Materialists would rather sweep that one under the table then deal with the evidencewallstreeter43
October 9, 2014
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Yea BornAgain, but everyone that knows him knows that him being even this optimistic says that he has personally changed his mind, but publicly he needs statements like the ones he made to keep that good ole funding coming in, but like you Said BA, this is very bad time to be an atheist lol. I was just over on the james Randi site and an article he had on his site told atheists/materialists not to panic. Parnias study didn't prove life after death, it just proved that someone could have conscious awareness without a functioning brain. loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooool I thought my head was going to literally pop open when I heard this statement. In fact im still chuckling a few days later even thinking of it. I have never seen anyone so desperate to want to hold onto their worldview so desperately even against their own precious science's evidences against them, and on top of that his sheeple are still towing the official line , that its all bunk. What did PT barnum say? Oh yea "there's a sucker born every minute " lolwallstreeter43
October 9, 2014
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And since Parnia, who set the 'number test' up, now concedes the evidence for remote viewing of the hospital room is 'very credible', why don't you, like Parnia, also now accept that NDE's 'may' be real as Parnia does? Is your threshold of evidence stronger than his? If so where is your peer-reviewed research?
One man, however, gave a “very credible” account of what was going on while doctors and nurses tried to bring him back to life – and says that he felt he was observing his resuscitation from the corner of the room. Speaking to The Telegraph about the evidence provided by a 57-year-old social worker Southampton, Dr Parnia said: “We know the brain can’t function when the heart has stopped beating. “But in this case, conscious awareness appears to have continued for up to three minutes. “The man described everything that had happened in the room, but importantly, he heard two bleeps from a machine that makes a noise at three minute intervals. So we could time how long the experienced lasted for. “He seemed very credible and everything that he said had happened to him had actually happened.” http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/life-after-death-largestever-study-provides-evidence-that-out-of-body-and-neardeath-experiences-may-actually-be-real-9780195.html
Or why don't you accept these following testimonies that happened at other hospitals? Pam Reynold’s comments on seeing here temporal body during her Near Death Experience at the 9:20 mark of the following video,,,
“It (my body) looked like pretty much what it was. As in void of life.” The (Extremely Monitored) NDE of Pam Reynolds – video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNbdUEqDB-k also “I think death is an illusion. I think death is a really nasty, bad lie. I don’t see any truth in the word death at all” – Pam Reynolds Lowery (1956 – May 22, 2010)
The following is on par with Pam Reynolds’ Near Death Experience. In the following video, Dr. Lloyd Rudy, a pioneer of cardiac surgery, tells stories of two patients who came back to life after being declared dead, and what they told him.
Famous Cardiac Surgeon’s Stories of Near Death Experiences in Surgery http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JL1oDuvQR08
also
Michaela’s Amazing NEAR death experience – video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTcHWz6UMZ8 Blind Woman Can See During Near Death Experience (NDE) – Pim von Lommel – video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKyQJDZuMHE
of related interest:
Near-Death Experiences: Putting a Darwinist's Evidentiary Standards to the Test - Dr. Michael Egnor - October 15, 2012 Excerpt: Indeed, about 20 percent of NDE's are corroborated, which means that there are independent ways of checking about the veracity of the experience. The patients knew of things that they could not have known except by extraordinary perception -- such as describing details of surgery that they watched while their heart was stopped, etc. Additionally, many NDE's have a vividness and a sense of intense reality that one does not generally encounter in dreams or hallucinations.,,, The most "parsimonious" explanation -- the simplest scientific explanation -- is that the (Near Death) experience was real. Tens of millions of people have had such experiences. That is tens of millions of more times than we have observed the origin of species , (or the origin of life, or the origin of a molecular machine), which is never.,,, The materialist reaction, in short, is unscientific and close-minded. NDE's show fellows like Coyne at their sneering unscientific irrational worst. Somebody finds a crushed fragment of a fossil and it's earth-shaking evidence. Tens of million of people have life-changing spiritual experiences and it's all a big yawn. Note: Dr. Egnor is professor and vice-chairman of neurosurgery at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. http://www.evolutionnews.org/2012/10/near_death_expe_1065301.html "A recent analysis of several hundred cases showed that 48% of near-death experiencers reported seeing their physical bodies from a different visual perspective. Many of them also reported witnessing events going on in the vicinity of their body, such as the attempts of medical personnel to resuscitate them (Kelly et al., 2007)." Kelly, E. W., Greyson, B., & Kelly, E. F. (2007). Unusual experiences near death and related phenomena. In E. F. Kelly, E. W. Kelly, A. Crabtree, A. Gauld, M. Grosso, & B. Greyson, Irreducible mind (pp. 367-421). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. Dr. Jeffrey Long: Just how strong is the evidence for a afterlife? - video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mptGAc3XWPs
bornagain77
October 9, 2014
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What about the study that Parnia did where he placed numbers above the operating room to verify NDE's and to date not one person has seen them? That would seem like counter evidence to me.JLAfan2001
October 9, 2014
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I once had the pleasure to talk to the now late Dr. Maurice Rawlings, who converted to Christianity after one of his patients was coming in and out of a negative Near Death Experience.geoffrobinson
October 9, 2014
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Thanks for the correction wallstreeter43, I didn't know the full story, but did know enough about Parnia to know that he was overly cautious,,, a trait which I can see would provide ample fodder for atheists to try to find a toe-hold.,,, i.e. Another day, Another bad day for atheists.bornagain77
October 9, 2014
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Actually born again , doctor Parnia was a darling of atheist/skeptics just a few years ago and I remember watching a video of him at one of their yearly conferences . I'd imagine they will probably turn on him if they haven't done so already , but he looks like he doesn't give a rats petunia about it. Like BA said the May nit coming from parnia is bad news for doubters of nde's and materialists . It's just going to keep getting worse for them, but there is a big Aussie atheist group that is imploring them to accept the evidence and to try to find a way to explain this in a materialistic way. This was a few years back. They should have listened to him instead of doubling down on their skepticism because it might be too late for them to save face now .wallstreeter43
October 9, 2014
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I don't doubt it, actually BA77. I was really commenting on the negative influence of atheist 'science' on clarity.Axel
October 8, 2014
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Axel, If you knew a bit more about Parnia, and the extremely cautious approach he takes in his studies, you would understand that 'may not' coming from one of his studies is equivalent to a full fledged falsification of every reasonable materialistic alternative put forth.bornagain77
October 8, 2014
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'.... may not require a functioning brain?' May not? Sounds like hard evidence to me. But I think I understand why it's expressed tentatively. Eventually you get to feel that the inmates running the insane asylum is the proper order of things. And the sane, properly, the inmates. Kafkaesque.Axel
October 8, 2014
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Sorry. The first sentence of the second paragraph should read: 'Wwhere the most compelling NDEers are either emotional from the start to the finish of the video, when recollecting their experience, most when describing the love for them expressed by the Being of Light, the Christ figure, she just seemed excited to be recounting it.' I'm not denying the reality of the young woman's NDE, as I would some, but just remarking that it seems to me, personally, a missed opportunity by the blogger to show one of the more awesome NDEs.Axel
October 8, 2014
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I was astonished that out of the many more compelling NDE's the blogger at the first link should have chosen that one. The young woman who was the subject of the NDE conveyed none of the deep peace most NDEers do, but was birdy and almost hyperventilating with excitement. Where the most compelling NDEers are either emotional when recollecting their experience from start to finish, or notably when describing the love they felt expressed for them by the Being of Light, the Christ figure, though never, I believe expressly identified by himself as such. Knowledge and speech are, in any case, conveyed telepathically. Where other NDEers, including Big Shots, such as a Businessman of the Year, were invariably deeply disappointed to return, though persuaded by the love of their family, she wanted to! The immense love she felt wasn't as immense by a long chalk, as theirs, obviously. Moreover, where they changed their life priorities to a single desire to help others, she was ruing 'wrong decisions she'd taken, leading to 'missed opportunities', etc. And this, after describing how she'd been a frantic work-a-holic, before. Very odd. The body-language of the subjects of the most compelling NDEs is arguably the most compelling aspect of their testimony: a sense of personal peace, a return of the fathomless love that the Being of Light had shown to them, and a complete change of outlook on their return to this vale of tears, henceforth dedicated to loving and caring for the people around them.Axel
October 8, 2014
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Autumn Leaf's Laughter - photo poem https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=856949420984659&set=pb.100000088262100.-2207520000.1412787125.&type=3&src=https%3A%2F%2Fscontent-a-ord.xx.fbcdn.net%2Fhphotos-xfa1%2Ft31.0-8%2F10694248_856949420984659_6096866922116550412_o.jpg&smallsrc=https%3A%2F%2Fscontent-a-ord.xx.fbcdn.net%2Fhphotos-xap1%2Fv%2Ft1.0-9%2F10665227_856949420984659_6096866922116550412_n.jpg%3Foh%3De696aeb8fe74b88b04356e8b6b0148da%26oe%3D54AF2939&size=816%2C1056bornagain77
October 8, 2014
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A wonderful quote from a link in Jim Smith's #1 'Sir John Eccles (Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine): I maintain that the human mystery is incredibly demeaned by scientific reductionism, with its claim in promissory materialism to account eventually for all of the spiritual world in terms of patterns of neuronal activity. This belief must be classed as a superstition(!!!) ... we have to recognize that we are spiritual beings with souls existing in a spiritual world as well as material beings with bodies and brains existing in a material world.' I've edited the formatting and punctuation a trifle, as you will no doubt have concluded.Axel
October 8, 2014
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Near Death Experience Documentary - commonalities of the experience - video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTuMYaEB35U In The Presence Of Almighty God – The NDE of Mickey Robinson – video https://vimeo.com/92172680bornagain77
October 8, 2014
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As to the passing comment in the Independent article that NDEs are similar across cultures around the world, that simply is not what I have found. All foreign, non-Judeo-Christian culture, NDE studies I have looked at have a extreme rarity of encounters with 'The Being Of Light' and tend to be very unpleasant NDE's save for the few pleasant children's NDEs of those cultures that I've seen (It seems there is indeed an 'age of accountability'). The following study was shocking for what was found in some non-Judeo-Christian NDE's that I looked at:
Near-Death Experiences in Thailand - Todd Murphy: Excerpt:The Light seems to be absent in Thai NDEs. So is the profound positive affect found in so many Western NDEs. The most common affect in our collection is negative. Unlike the negative affect in so many Western NDEs (cf. Greyson & Bush, 1992), that found in Thai NDEs (in all but case #11) has two recognizable causes. The first is fear of 'going'. The second is horror and fear of hell. It is worth noting that although half of our collection include seeing hell (cases 2,6,7,9,10) and being forced to witness horrific tortures, not one includes the NDEer having been subjected to these torments themselves. http://www.shaktitechnology.com/thaindes.htm Near Death Experience Thailand Asia - video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8M5J3zWG5g
A few more foreign NDE studies:
Near-Death Experiences Among Survivors of the 1976 Tangshan Earthquake (Chinese) Excerpt: Our subjects reported NDE phemenological items not mentioned, or rarely mentioned in NDE's reported from other countries: sensations of the world being exterminated or ceasing to exist, a sense of weightlessness, a feeling of being pulled or squeezed, ambivalence about death, a feeling of being a different person, or a different kind of person and unusual scents. The predominant phemenological features in our series were feeling estranged from the body as if it belonged to someone else, unusually vivid thoughts, loss of emotions, unusual bodily sensations, life seeming like a dream, a feeling of dying,,, These are not the same phemenological features most commonly found by researchers in other countries. Greyson (1983) reported the most common phemenological feature of American NDE's to be a feeling of peace, joy, time stopping, experiencing an unearthly realm of existence, a feeling of cosmic unity, and a out of body experience. http://www.newdualism.org/nde-papers/Zhi-ying/Zhi-ying-Journal%20of%20Near-Death%20Studies_1992-11-39-48.pdf The Japanese find death a depressing experience - From an item by Peter Hadfield in the New Scientist (Nov. 30th 1991) Excerpt: A study in Japan shows that even in death the Japanese have an original way of looking at things. Instead of seeing 'tunnels of light' or having 'out of body' experiences, near-dead patients in Japanese hospitals tend to see rather less romantic images, according to researchers at Kyorin University. According to a report in the Mainichi newspaper, a group of doctors from Kyorin has spent the past year documenting the near-death experiences of 17 patients. They had all been resuscitated from comas caused by heart attacks, strokes, asthma or drug poisoning. All had shown minimal signs of life during the coma. Yoshia Hata, who led the team, said that eight of the 17 recalled 'dreams', many featuring rivers or ponds. Five of those patients had dreams which involved fear, pain and suffering. One 50-year-old asthmatic man said he had seen himself wade into a reservoir and do a handstand in the shallows. 'Then I walked out of the water and took some deep breaths. In the dream, I was repeating this over and over.' Another patient, a 73-year-old woman with cardiac arrest, saw a cloud filled with dead people. 'It was a dark, gloomy day. I was chanting sutras. I believed they could be saved if they chanted sutras, so that is what I was telling them to do.' Most of the group said they had never heard of Near-Death Experiences before. http://www.pureinsight.org/node/4 Several studies (Pasricha, 1986, Schorer, 1985-86) & Kellehear, 1993) Murphy 1999,2001) have indicated that the phenomenologies of NDEs is culture-bound. (Of Note: Judeo-Christian Culture NDEs are by far the most pleasant "phenomena") http://www.shaktitechnology.com/thaindestxt.htm
Researching Muslim NDEs, on the web at the NDERF home page, I find that there are only a handful of Muslim NDE experiences out of the thousands of NDE's they have listed on their web site. There was only one really deep Muslim NDE that I could find in which there is a reference to "the Light". Not surprisingly, this NDE occurred to a teenage boy. In the handful of somewhat deep adult Muslim NDEs that I have read about, the Muslim NDES never mentioned "the Light", "Supreme Being" or a "Being of Light". If this holds steady for all adult Muslim NDEs, then this will fall into stark contrast to the majority of deep Judeo/Christian NDE testimonies of adults for the western world. Of related interest is this American Muslim's extremely negative NDE testimony:
Mesiah from I Survived Beyond and Back part 2 - video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FehcSO5YNUI
etc.. etc.. Verse:
2 Corinthians 12:3-4 And I know how such a man-- whether in the body or apart from the body I do not know, God knows-- was caught up into Paradise and heard inexpressible words, which a man is not permitted to speak.
bornagain77
October 8, 2014
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Here a few good testimonies of seeing stuff in and around the operating room during a Near Death Exprience (NDE):
Michaela's Amazing NEAR death experience - video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTcHWz6UMZ8 Blind Woman Can See During Near Death Experience (NDE) - Pim von Lommel - video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKyQJDZuMHE
Pam Reynold’s comments on seeing here temporal body during her Near Death Experience at the 9:20 mark of the following video,,,
“It (my body) looked like pretty much what it was. As in void of life.” The (Extremely Monitored) NDE of Pam Reynolds – video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNbdUEqDB-k also "I think death is an illusion. I think death is a really nasty, bad lie. I don’t see any truth in the word death at all" – Pam Reynolds Lowery (1956 – May 22, 2010)
The following is on par with Pam Reynolds' Near Death Experience. In the following video, Dr. Lloyd Rudy, a pioneer of cardiac surgery, tells stories of two patients who came back to life after being declared dead, and what they told him.
Famous Cardiac Surgeon’s Stories of Near Death Experiences in Surgery http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JL1oDuvQR08
As to to claim that NDEs are hallucinations, the researchers in the following article set up a study to prove that NDE were merely hallucinations. Humorously, they did not expect the results that they got:
'Afterlife' feels 'even more real than real,' researcher says - Wed April 10, 2013 Excerpt: "If you use this questionnaire ... if the memory is real, it's richer, and if the memory is recent, it's richer," he said. The coma scientists weren't expecting what the tests revealed. "To our surprise, NDEs were much richer than any imagined event or any real event of these coma survivors," Laureys reported. The memories of these experiences beat all other memories, hands down, for their vivid sense of reality. "The difference was so vast," he said with a sense of astonishment. Even if the patient had the experience a long time ago, its memory was as rich "as though it was yesterday," Laureys said. http://www.cnn.com/2013/04/09/health/belgium-near-death-experiences/
bornagain77
October 8, 2014
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Of course, there's all kind of evidence that consciousness is not limited to the body and survives death, but there's no penetrating ideological hyperskepticism.William J Murray
October 8, 2014
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What do readers think?
The evidence for the afterlife adds to the argument of intelligent design. If there is a civilization of spirits that use the human organism for the purposes of incarnation, then there is a good reason to suspect that civilization would modify the organism to best suit its purposes. If spirits are non-physical then that is also a good reason to suspect there could be intelligent designers of the physical universe. Regarding The Independent article, I think NDE's are proof that consciousness survives death. All of the materialist "explanations" of NDEs (ie lack of oxygen, hallucinations, REM intrusions, cultural/religious expectations, etc.) are refuted here: http://ncu9nc.blogspot.com/2013/07/materialist-explanations-of-ndes-fail.html There are eighteen anomalies of near-death experiences that materialists cannot explain: http://ncu9nc.blogspot.com/2014/04/anomalous-characteristics-of-near-death.html NDErs who have expertise that gives their opinion authority such as Psychologist Carl Jung, Neurosurgeon Eben Alexander, and military remote viewer, Joe MacMoneagle believed NDEs are experiences of the afterlife. http://ncu9nc.blogspot.com/2014/04/notable-near-death-experiencers-prove.html All of the main researchers, MD's who study the phenomenon, and know most about it believe NDEs show that consciousness continues when the brain is not functioning. Sam Parnia: http://ncu9nc.blogspot.com/2013/03/interview-with-near-death-researcher.html Pim van Lommel: http://ncu9nc.blogspot.com/2012/10/interview-of-nde-researcher-dr-pim-van.html Eben Alexander: http://ncu9nc.blogspot.com/2012/10/neurosurgeon-dr-eben-alexander-heaven.html Melvin Morse: http://ncu9nc.blogspot.com/2012/05/skeptiko-interview-with-dr-melvin-morse.html There is a huge amount of evidence of the afterlife in addition to NDEs: http://ncu9nc.blogspot.com/p/62014-contents-evidence-for-afterlife.html#articles_by_subject_afterlifeJim Smith
October 8, 2014
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