Darwinism Intelligent Design Religion

The BBC on “how religion evolved”

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Generally, speaking, as usual, Darwinian concepts prove of anything, everything, and nothing, which makes them perfect for dissemination on increasingly irrelevant tax burdens like the BBC. On the subject of Catholics and holy communion, for example, a BBC journalist suggests it started as food-sharing among ape-like creatures (that’s not at all the recorded history of the Christian rite of holy communion but never mind):

The author, journalist Brandon Ambrosino, wanders off into a discussion as to whether religion is an adaptation or a spandrel. Does belief in God arise because it helps us in the struggle for reproductive fitness (“Don’t use that birth control, honey!”) or because, while it is adaptatively neutral, it is linked to adaptation (“I met a really cute girl at Mass today!”). Of course, if Darwinism is true, how is one to know? “Natural selection” has no mind and thus no purposes, and adaptation is really just the consequence of internal biological constraints and natural history.

So evolutionary “research” is just story time, not much different from fables told to children except that you (the taxpayers) pay for the stories. The meter is always running… Michael Egnor, “How Did Religion “Evolve”?” at Evolution News and Science Today:

The BBC demonstrates its independence from its funding sources by sponsoring stuff no one would pay for if they were not compelled to do so by law.

It’s telling that one kind of evolution always seems to be missing from these “theories” about the evolutionary origins of religion. How did atheism evolve? Surely godlessness had its origins in neocortices of impious apes. Why did some apes evolve to become materialists, Darwinists and atheists? It certainly seems maladaptive — it’s doubtful that contemplating the Origin of Species makes you more fecund. Michael Egnor, “How Did Religion “Evolve”?” at Evolution News and Science Today:

Statistically, atheism functions as an efficient form of birth suppression but—of course— a Darwinian explanation can be found for that too.

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See also: Michael Egnor: Apes are NOT spiritual beings

and

Free Will: One Woman’s Left Hand Seemed To Have A Mind Of Its Own.Did It?

Michael Egnor is a neurosurgeon, professor of Neurological Surgery and Pediatrics and Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Neurological Surgery, Stonybrook School of Medicine

2 Replies to “The BBC on “how religion evolved”

  1. 1
    Pearlman says:

    how did the religion of secular humanism devolve to being so pathetic? arrogance, Darwin doctrine and self deceit.

  2. 2
    Axel says:

    Just that header, ‘The BBC on “how religion evolved.”’ made me laugh the moment I read it. No doubt their executives are geniuses, as are we all, as Einstein pointed out :

    ‘Everybody is a Genius. But If You Judge a Fish by Its Ability to Climb a Tree, It Will Live Its Whole Life Believing that It is Stupid.’

    The difference being that those executives and their favoured gurus do not believe themselves stupid in dismissing ‘religion’ as a primitive ‘mind-f*rt’.

    ‘Don’t call us. We’ll call you’, springs to mind. Pretty much in line with a certain monstrous economist, responsible for this catastrophic, neoliberal polarisation of the world’s wealth into the coffers of those who are already rich beyond the dreams of avarice. (a figure of speech, since some men’s avarice is clearly infinite).

    He was button-holed by a novelist neighbour in the well of a lift in their apartment building, and was given the latter’s ‘recipe’ for sound economics, and was told by His Nibs : ‘Tell you what. How about, when I want advice on writing a novel, I come to you for advice, and when you want advice on economics, you come to me.

    Just imagine if that ‘economist’ had heeded his novelist-neighbour’s advice, no matter how daft it turned out to be, it would have been most unlikely to lead to the economic and environmental catastrophe (think Fukushima) we are currently facing. To think …. history, in its very broadest outline, can turn on a sixpence.

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