Intelligent Design Philosophy Science

C. S. Lewis and the limits of science

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Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis - Ward, Michael

He saw it as a limited language:

Lewis’s attitude toward science, though very positive and respectful, was not uncritical. He believed that science, like all human enterprises, has its limits and that those limits needed to be understood and observed not only for the sake of other disciplines but for the sake of science itself. In The Abolition of Man, Lewis deprecates “unscientific followers of science”: those who overvalue the scientific method or accept scientific pronouncements without question. He argues that these people may suppose themselves to be devotees of the discipline, when in fact, they are undermining it from within. As an intellectual historian and an interested observer of scientific developments, Lewis often took aim at this error.

Michael Ward, “Numb and Numb-er” at Plough (April 28, 2022)

Michael Ward is the author of Planet Narnia (2010).

One Reply to “C. S. Lewis and the limits of science

  1. 1
    asauber says:

    “those who overvalue the scientific method or accept scientific pronouncements without question.”

    Sounds familiar.

    Andrew

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