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Feser (and Ross) on the immateriality of the mind

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Edward Feser has presented a lecture on the immateriality of the mind, which is worth listening to:

The papers here and here will flesh out details.

The core logic of the argument pivots on the principle of distinct identity, turned to how distinguishable entities are inherently different. Syllogistically:

1: Formal thought processes can have an exact or unambiguous conceptual content.

However,

2: Nothing material can have an exact or unambiguous conceptual content.

So,

3: Formal thought processes are not material.

Worth pondering as we reflect on this season.

Enjoy the Christmas season. END

7 Replies to “Feser (and Ross) on the immateriality of the mind

  1. 1
    kairosfocus says:

    Feser (and Ross) on the immateriality of the mind — a video. (Notice how he contrasts a sketch of a triangle with the exact spatial, conceptual construct . . . Mathematics surfaces yet again as essentially abstract.)

  2. 2
    Barry Arrington says:

    Pink unicorns are easy to conceptualize in the mind. Yet no material pink unicorn exists. It follows that the pink unicorn I am thinking about right now is immaterial.

  3. 3
    kairosfocus says:

    Circles, triangles, numbers, truth, right . . .

  4. 4
    bornagain77 says:

    As far as a best scientific instruments will allow us to measure the mathematical predictions, platonic perfection is not only approached, but arguably reached in the physical universe for the flat universe, relativity, and the quantum amplituhedron

    Platonic perfection, flat universe, relativity, and the quantum amplituhedron (Dec. 2018)
    https://uncommondescent.com/intelligent-design/what-is-the-platonic-realm/#comment-670120

  5. 5
    Otangelo Grasso says:

    Einstein’s Gulf: Can Evolution cross it? by John Oller, Ph.d

    The mind cannot emerge from matter

    http://reasonandscience.catsbo.....ein-s-gulf

    Albert Einstein,undoubtedly one of the greatest scientists of all time, described the “gulf’ that logically separates the concrete world of hard objects on the one hand from the abstract world of ideas on the other. He wrote: We have the habit of combining certain concepts and conceptual relations (propositions) so definitely with certain sense experiences that we do not become conscious of the gulf-logically unbridgeable which separates the world of sensory experiences from the world of concepts and propositions

    On the one side, we find the real world of objects, events, and tensional spacetime relations. On the other side, we find fully abstract representations that contain information about the material world. That articulate information is abstracted first by our senses, secondarily by our bodily actions, and tertiarily by our ability to use one or more particular languages . Between the two realms we find what appears to be an uncrossable gulf.

    A small part of the materialists problem is that hard objects are never observed spontaneously to transform themselves (on their own recognizance) into abstract ideas.

    Albert Einstein, “Remarks on Bertrand Russell’s Theory of Knowledge,” The Philosophy of Bertrand Russell, Vol. 5 of The Library of Living Philosophers, editor Paul Arthur Schilpp (LaSalle, Illinois, Open Court, 1944), p. 289.

    I am convinced that … the concepts which arise in our thought and in our linguistic expressions are all—when viewed logically—the free creations of thought which cannot inductively be gained from sense experiences. … we have the habit of combining certain concepts and conceptual relations (propositions) so definitely with certain sense experiences that we do not become conscious of the gulf—logically unbridgeable—which separates the world of sensory experiences from the world of concepts and propositions

  6. 6
    PavelU says:

    Was there anybody awake at the end of that presentation?

  7. 7
    kairosfocus says:

    PU, Philosophy may not be your cup of tea but there are many people who value it and would be fascinated by such a presentation. KF

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