David Tyler has a background in physics (BSc and MSc) and a career that has led him into management (PhD). He had 8 years experience in applied research followed by other industrial experiences. As a UK academic, he is involved in teaching and research. He seeks to counter ideologies that seek to confine Christianity to personal, private and subjective spheres of life. Science is not a value-free platform for the development of knowledge, but a human activity that is built on metaphysics that scientists bring to their work. These issues are explored in his current literature blogs at Access Research Network.
Intelligent Design

Portraits of Dissent

Conspiracies to suppress, manipulate and distort information undoubtedly occur. Society needs to be vigilant to guard against deception. An increasing number of alleged conspiracies are being covered by the media, all reflecting in some way on the integrity of politicians, or business leaders or the scientific enterprise. Conspiracy theorists are skilled in appealing to emotion, Read More…

Intelligent Design

The intriguing beak of the earliest known pelican

Although geographically widespread, the genus Pelecanus has only 7 or 8 species extant (depending on the classification system used). A similar number of fossil species have been identified, although the morphological differences are quite small. Until recently, the earliest fossil form was dated as Early Miocene. Newly published work pushed the first appearance back to Read More…

Intelligent Design

Does the human genome have “serious molecular shortcomings”?

John Avise commences his paper with a quotation from Michael Behe affirming that research into the molecular workings of the cell leads unambiguously to the conclusion: “design!” To counter this, Avise presents the human genome as clear evidence for non-sentient design. He thinks that conventional evolutionary mechanisms are perfectly capable of explaining complexity, declaring: “it Read More…

Intelligent Design

Bipedal walking at Laetoli

The Laetoli trackways from Tanzania were first reported in 1979 and immediately attracted attention because they provided evidence of bipedalism. The tracks were preserved in volcanic ash dated at 3.6 million years. Many at the time thought they looked exactly like human footprints, but few of the researchers were willing to adopt this interpretation. The Read More…